A Vote for Civilization

I had a cataract surgically removed yesterday, replaced with a Bausch & Lomb model MX60E enVista intraocular lens.    The 30 minute procedure is anointed with happy juice.  Wake up, look through the room.  It is transformative.  If you are 60 or older, you are past your sell-by date.

I was Senior Research Scientist / material and process at two IOL manufacturers.  We were very good indeed.  Current plain vanilla IOLS are beyond anything we imagined.  The fancy ones are Sales and Marketing hallucinations, SOP.  Buyer beware.

If you think some puke idiot with “ideas” and a slogan is a fair trade for your eyesight, join in.  If not, kill them.  Either way, the clock ticks onward.  Don’t you believe that a miniature elastomeric aspheric optic that evolved through the finest minds and huge expenditures over three decades will reappear through the dialectic of liberation.  They’ll rob you blind.

Restoring eyesight
MX60E enVista IOL. Lens size is a cooked lentil.
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10 thoughts on “A Vote for Civilization”

  1. Been there done that back in 2005, both eyes….

    (…so long ago can’t remember, but picture file is dated September 2005)

    My biggest surprise was the color white and white paper. I got used to what I thought was white, but was actually a semi-old newspaper yellow. Blue Cross/ Blue Shield paid 100%, no copay at all!

    Note cloudiness in before picture.

    Enjoy your NEW VISION !!!

    (Get a few pair of polarized sunglasses, they will help in the long run and stay away from intense UV light.)

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  2. had two of those. why our elites want to ruin American medicine for the middle class is beyond me.

    Just a working guy who always made sure the blue cross was paid. Managed for the family breast cancer (sucessful after fifteen years) heart attack, diabetes (beat it), appendix, nasal surgery, HBP, cataracts, macular pucker on a host of more. Did not go bankrupt (although the cancer came close).

    All successful. Wife now waiting on new hip.

    Explain how the system is broken ?

    If people without a job need help , don’t screw up the part that works.

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  3. “Many ingenious lovely things are gone/That seemed sheer miracle to the multitude,/ Protected from the circle of the moon/That pitches common things about..”

    —Yeats, NineteenHundred and Nineteen

    Im sure you know that the Khmer Rouge massacred anybody who wore glasses!  Do you think our  emerging Red Guard will allow this kind of technology to continue to be developed?  No way.  Y’know, they gouged the gold fillings out of prisoners’ teeth in WW II…if I were you, I wouldn’t bruit it about  that you are implanted with one of these marvelous devices thanks to capitalism and technology.

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  4. One eye is done at a time.  The sudden color contrast is gobsmacking; resolution and contrast are wonderful..  Old lenses are yellowed (Maillard reaction).  I visited my opthalmologist this morning.  Everything is A-OK.  We do the other  side next week.  One day post-op, with no correction, I read 20/25.  The prior prescription was -9.00D spherical with o.5oD cylindrical.

    Hire the Gifted to save the world.  Hire the diverse to entertain it.  Pol Pot the Pol Pots, with no indecision or stay of hand.  Mount their heads on pikes to rot, if not to educate others, then to warn them.

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  5. Gerry_D:
    Been there done that back in 2005, both eyes….

    (…so long ago can’t remember, but picture file is dated September 2005)

    My biggest surprise was the color white and white paper. I got used to what I thought was white, but was actually a semi-old newspaper yellow. Blue Cross/ Blue Shield paid 100%, no copay at all!

    Note cloudiness in before picture.

    Enjoy your NEW VISION !!!

    (Get a few pair of polarized sunglasses, they will help in the long run and stay away from intense UV light.)

    If you get these implants, do you need to avoid physically rough activity like horseback riding?

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  6. Hypatia:

    Gerry_D:
    Been there done that back in 2005, both eyes….

    Enjoy your NEW VISION !!!

    (Get a few pair of polarized sunglasses, they will help in the long run and stay away from intense UV light.)

    If you get these implants, do you need to avoid physically rough activity like horseback riding?

    Excuse me? No….

    Let me explain…

    The cataract is removed by Phacoemulsification, (Phaco), A small incision is made on the side of the cornea and an ultrasound probe is used to emulsify the cloudy lens and that is removed by suction. The replacement lens, calculated as to dimensions akin to dimensions obtained for a regular eye examination, is inserted into the space that lens with the cataract had occupied. Note the attachments on the displayed lens. Those are spring like and are compressed when inserting the replacement lens. Once inserted they spring open and hold the lens securely in place within the area of the natural lens. The lens becomes part of the eye.

    One side effect sometimes encountered is that the clear “sac” that had housed the previous lens may adhere to the replacement lens causing vision to be less than perfect. A simple laser procedure is used to burn away part of this sac from the new lens and restores near perfect vision.

    The other problem that may be encountered is ageing of the eye proper. It may change shape slightly and the predetermined prescription implanted lens is designed and the prescription is determined for an eye that had a different shape so vision may become blurry.  Corrections may be made by replacing the lens, (expensive now as most insurances will not cover a second replacement), or external corrective lenses, (glasses) less expensive.

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  7. That is a good explanation, plus a few footnotes for cognoscenti.  The IOL pictured is not the best one can do, though I won’t say “it’s crap.”  Absent fenestrations the surgeon cannot easily dial it into the bag through the cookie-cutter front incision through which he uncreated the OEM lens. I wont say “the haptic will fail at the near-lens constriction.”

    If you choose an “advanced” IOL you pay for it out of pocket (as an “experiment medical device,” being euchered out of malpractice pursuit), about $1500.  A plain vanilla IOL is about $500 and fully covered by insurance (unless they cheat you).

    Early on, other companies, there were IOLs that hopped a haptic out of the bag, a haptic landing in the space between the cilliary body proper and the iris, behind the puil.  A new anatomical compartment suddenly appeared, the “sulcus.”  “Sulcus placement” was not easily pursuable as malpractice.

    Ten of our one-piece IOLs were compression-mounted in a line between two aluminum square bars bolted to the desk, haptic curvature straight up.  A thin aluminum bar was rigidly mounted to a 60 Hz woofer.  Its parallel contact downstroke was 3 mm.  Turn it on, come back a scant three weeks after 100 million strokes.  100% survival.  God help you if your production lot did not pass.  Only perfection should make it off the loading dock – and that’s expensive.

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  8. Been there, done that two years ago.  I was able to throw away my prescription glasses except for reading.  If I had it to do all over again, I’d get one optimized for close work, the other for far.  All you need is one for either distance-the brain does the rest.  The only bad thing was that, once I discarded the glasses, the world can see my big, puffy bags that were not noticed behind the glasses.  Now, they’re right out there in public.

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  9. RB49:
    Been there, done that two years ago.  I was able to throw away my prescription glasses except for reading.  If I had it to do all over again, I’d get one optimized for close work, the other for far.  All you need is one for either distance-the brain does the rest.  The only bad thing was that, once I discarded the glasses, the world can see my big, puffy bags that were not noticed behind the glasses.  Now, they’re right out there in public.

    I feared the “one optimized for distance and one optimized for close”, what I read was some people would not adapt, and knowing my luck I would be among the some. My vision is good up to 12 inches, (30 centimeters), closer and it gets blurry, but that’s what dollar store cheaters are for. I have two pair now for over three years.

    My father had cataracts removed, maybe before I was born even, in any case, I was very young and remember his glasses were really like coke bottle bottoms. He passed away in `76,  I pray to God he is seeing well now and sorely wish that the technology would have been available for him in his lifetime.

    As for the “big puffy eye bags”, I got em’ also and very droopy upper lids and very fleshy bags below my eyebrows. I was supposed to get that fixed, but COVID-19 came and  I feared, so I canceled it. Actually I had something going on in the back of my head and as it was about a week before the COVID-19 madness, something told me to cancel and so I did.

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  10. RB49:
    Been there, done that two years ago.  I was able to throw away my prescription glasses except for reading.  If I had it to do all over again, I’d get one optimized for close work, the other for far.  All you need is one for either distance-the brain does the rest.  The only bad thing was that, once I discarded the glasses, the world can see my big, puffy bags that were not noticed behind the glasses.  Now, they’re right out there in public.

    Never mind what OTHER people see; I’m afraid of the mirror….

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