The National Garden

President Trump’s plan for the National Garden of American Heroes will include statues of these illustrious Americans: John Adams, Susan B. Anthony, Clara Barton, Daniel Boone, Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, Henry Clay, Davy Crockett, Frederick Douglass, Amelia Earhart, Benjamin Franklin, Billy Graham, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Martin Luther King, Jr., Abraham Lincoln, Douglas MacArthur, Dolly Madison, James Madison, Christa McAuliffe, Audie Murphy, George Patton, Jr., Ronald Reagan, Jackie Robinson, Betsy Ross, Antonin Scalia, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Tubman, Booker T. Washington, George Washington, and Orville and Wilbur Wright.

It should be open to public access before the 250th anniversary of the proclamation of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 2026, according to the press release.

I love this idea, announced tonight in the shadow of Mt. Rushmore. An absolute triumph.

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21 thoughts on “The National Garden”

  1. If Harriet Beecher Stowe is on that list, Alfred Thayer Mahan should be as well. His book (The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660–1783) was just as influential as hers.

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  2. Hypatia:

    Robert A. McReynolds:
    What in the hell is HB Stowe doing on this list? All she did was marry a wealthy New Englander and write a book.

    Didn’t Lincoln call her “the little lady who started this big  War”?

    Probably but the actual catalyst, if we are going to narrow it down to one person, was John Brown, whose presence in this little garden is much more deserving than that trollop from Boston.

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  3. The Task Force shall be chaired by the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary), and shall include the following additional members:

    (i)    the Administrator of General Services (Administrator);

    (ii)   the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA);

    (iii)  the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH);

    (iv)   the Chairman of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP); and

    (v)    any officers or employees of any executive department or agency (agency) designated by the President or the Secretary.

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  4. Mike LaRoche:
    If Harriet Beecher Stowe is on that list, Alfred Thayer Mahan should be as well. His book (The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660–1783) was just as influential as hers.

    Agreed.  But (thinking of sea power), more to the point, there needs to be a statue of Admiral Maury, whose monument was just removed last week from Monument Avenue in Richmond.  (As John Walker noted in the comments at his “Who’s Next?” post.)

    Maury’s The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855) set America in the lead in oceanography, and as director of the office of Charts and Instruments for the U.S. Navy he launched a series of technical data reports that transformed the field and firmly cemented America as a global naval power.

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  5. I would like to be more positive about this; I mean, I am positive about it, but I shudder to think what the Left will do with this.

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  6. Hypatia:
    I would like to be more positive about this; I mean, I am positive about it, but I shudder to think what the Left will do with this.

    Understood.  But Trump appointees are now at NEA and NEH so we should be OK.

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  7. One of the first duties of the Task Force is to select a site.

    I have a site nomination.

    Branson.

    Branson is near the geographic center of America.  Branson has a convention center and a bunch of motels, so that many gatherings will bring people to town where they could have access to the National Garden of Monuments to American Heroes.

    Branson is a place where real American people go.  It is a tourist trap of the best and most kitschy sort.  It has shows like “Dixie Stampede” and other patriotic celebrations of American values and spirit.

    Branson is the perfect place for Trump’s National Garden of American Heroes.   It would attract the sort of people who would appreciate it and enjoy it.  And the city fathers of Branson will not tolerate vandalism and violence.

    (My second place nomination would be Gatlinburg.)

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  8. Robert A. McReynolds:

    Hypatia:

    Robert A. McReynolds:
    What in the hell is HB Stowe doing on this list? All she did was marry a wealthy New Englander and write a book.

    Didn’t Lincoln call her “the little lady who started this big  War”?

    Probably but the actual catalyst, if we are going to narrow it down to one person, was John Brown, whose presence in this little garden is much more deserving than that trollop from Boston.

    Yes, I read a fabulous book about Brown  a few years ago.  A modern Jeremiah! He may be better known than  Stowe, marginally, but  he isnt as well-known as “Uncle Tom”.   I read that the “minstrel shows” in the North used to feature scenes from the book, and evoked widespread sympathy for the fictional characters.
    Yuh: the now universally reviled, anathematized  blackface minstrel shows were  instrumental in arousing abolitionist sentiment in the North.
    I read a novel  about Stephen Foster, Banished Children of Eve (Quinn, 1994)  About this tumultuous period.  I recommend it.

    I;fact I wish Trump had dared mention Foster( though I get why he didn’t) who was like an American Robert  Burns, only more remarkable, because he wrote the music as well as the lyrics, whereas Burns used folk melodies already in circulation and sEt his poems to the tunes.

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  9. Robert A. McReynolds:

    Hypatia:

    Robert A. McReynolds:
    What in the hell is HB Stowe doing on this list? All she did was marry a wealthy New Englander and write a book.

    Didn’t Lincoln call her “the little lady who started this big  War”?

    Probably but the actual catalyst, if we are going to narrow it down to one person, was John Brown, whose presence in this little garden is much more deserving than that trollop from Boston.

    Yes…Trollop?

    I spent a couple hours in Harpers Ferry years ago reading about John Brown while the more adventurous members of my family were off zip lining. One element has come back to my mind through all this statue-destruction. There was a plaque which our guide described as controversial but that the decision at that time was to leave it in place. It was erected circa 1900 by the Daughters of the Confederacy or some such, and commemorated a “good Negro” who had defended the town against Brown’s men. It must have been a tough call to leave it up, but it served to remind that every such situation is complicated, and also it made the Daughters of the Confederacy look kind of ridiculous.

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  10. I really like the poke in the eye at the Left. The devil’s in the details, though. Some of the choices will be controversial; Robert’s already complaining.😉

    I’m not so crazy about some of the names myself. Christa McAuliffe? Please. Sorry she got blown up but so did a bunch of other guys, one of them a local boy.

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  11. drlorentz:
    I really like the poke in the eye at the Left. The devil’s in the details, though. Some of the choices will be controversial; Robert’s already complaining.😉

    I’m not so crazy about some of the names myself. Christa McAuliffe? Please. Sorry she got blown up but so did a bunch of other guys, one of them a local boy.

    Thank you Doc for understanding my plight. 😉

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  12. Complaints will be aired about the choices, but I see the overarching message as: there have been ordinary people in our country’s past who made extraordinary contributions to our history, and they will be remembered for these virtues, not castigated for their common human flaws. No more celebrating what is bad about them – which is what ‘cancel culture’ is, it’s just reveling in the baser side of human nature. Instead we as a nation will honor and celebrate and promote the Good.

    And I also love the very fact that we will BUILD these memorials. Those adolescent ruiners who pulled down statues should be made to help with the labor and sweat in making this garden, to understand what goes into building real things. Give them some – what do you call it? – skin in the game.

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  13. Uncle Al:
    Arlington National Cemetery is also  Gen. Bobby Lee’s rose garden.  Honor prevails.

    Although it doesn’t deserve this honor especially as of late, I’d like to see the garden in our nation’s capitol.

    P.S. I was especially pleased to see Booker T’s name here and not his disdainful rival’s W.E. Dubois. Also, I enjoyed seeing Frederick Douglass on the list. He was Susan B. Anthony’s close associate and was truly the first male feminist when he made this remark in the late 19th century: “I’d rather be a Negro man than a woman of any color.”

    Wowser!

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