End of Hong Kong

The day of “One China, two systems” is over.

While you slept last night, Hong Kong lost its independence to China.

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s new national security laws came into effect at 1 am Sydney time, an hour before the 23rd anniversary of the handover of Hong Kong to Chinese rule.

The legislation was not made public before the bill was signed by Mr Xi in Beijing.

The Chinese Government has no interest in civility or compromise. It only wants dominance and subservience.

https://www.skynews.com.au/details/5efbebd1a0e8450018f923b9

Currently, China is conducting provocative naval exercises in the South China Sea.  The Trump Administration sent a large battle group for our own exercises in the South China Sea.

theweek.com/5things/923689/aircraft-carriers-conduct-exerises-south-china-sea-near-chinas-drills

Right now, with the economy hurting on account of Wuhan Virus, is President Trump willing to tighten the screws on China?

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20 thoughts on “End of Hong Kong”

  1. MJBubba:
    While you slept last night, Hong Kong lost its independence to China.

    I weep for the islands of Kowloon and Hong Kong. I was fortunate to do business there in the 80s and was never more impressed with such a free market capitalist environment.

    HK was the standard.

    As I traveled there 3-4 times a year, I developed close friendships with many of the entrepreneurs with whom I did business. I was enamoured with:

    1. 8% federal income tax.

    2. No welfare; saving face was all too important.

    3. Best service and hotels in the world.

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  2. Boris Johnson has announced that the U.K. is prepared to grant up to three million visas to Hong Kong residents which will permit them to live and work in the U.K. with the ability to apply for citizenship after a five year residence.  Three million is fully 40% of the entire 7.5 million population of Hong Kong.

    The U.S. should step up and offer to take the rest.  Hong Kong residents have a mean IQ of 108, tied with Singapore for highest in the world.

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  3. John Walker:
    Boris Johnson has announced that the U.K. is prepared to grant up to three million visas to Hong Kong residents which will permit them to live and work in the U.K. with the ability to apply for citizenship after a five year residence.  Three million is fully 40% of the entire 7.5 million population of Hong Kong.

    The U.S. should step up and offer to take the rest.  Hong Kong residents have a mean IQ of 108, tied with Singapore for highest in the world.

    I don’t agree because it’s a damn shame that the Kowloon/Hong Kong Island may no longer be the special place that it has been. I support the highly intelligent and motivated Han Chinese and I don’t want to see them assimilate in England or even in the U.S.

    They’re unique and highly independent people. I cannot reiterate the respect I developed for them over the years and I will not accept that they be forced to abdicate this property.

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  4. https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/07/05/never-trump-republicans-plot-give-democrats-senate-majority/
    … If only America could be overthrown with such agility and finitude by a Socialist “President for Life”! Can we borrow one (for life)?

    John Walker says:

    The U.S. should step up and offer to take the rest.  Hong Kong residents have a mean IQ of 108, tied with Singapore for highest in the world.

    Any IQ over 80 (OK, 60 – Black Lives Matter) is racist and incendiary.

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  5. John Walker:
    The U.S. should step up and offer to take the rest.  Hong Kong residents have a mean IQ of 108, tied with Singapore for highest in the world.

    I have no faith that we won’t end up with a low end segment.

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  6. The PinkChinks  probably figger they’ve weakened the US sufficiently now with Covid  and the Confucius Institutes that there’s nothing stsnding in their way.  Democracy has no powerful friends.

    As for HK’s  entire brilliant population coming to the Anglosphere, that’d be great for China, wouldn’t it?  They’ve got no shortage of people they can plant there.  Save ‘em the trouble of purging the intelligentsia à la Khmer Rouge…..

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  7. ctlaw:

    John Walker:
    The U.S. should step up and offer to take the rest.  Hong Kong residents have a mean IQ of 108, tied with Singapore for highest in the world.

    I have no faith that we won’t end up with a low end segment.

    Agree.

    More importantly, England and the U.S. are not their worlds. If an individual has never visited HK pre- 1997 or done business with these people, your opinion becomes somewhat meaningless to me.

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  8. Books by pro-democracy figures have been removed from public libraries in Hong Kong in the wake of a controversial new security law.

    So far, 10 people have been arrested for allegedly violating the new law. But fear and uncertainty are widespread. Protesters now call for demonstrators to hold up blank placards at marches. They fear that their words could lead to life imprisonment.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-53296810

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  9. Cool heads, everybody!  This was inevitable as soon as the sainted Margaret Thatcher relinquished the English claim to Hong Kong.  OK, the absorption into China was supposed to happen in 2047.  The fact it is happening early is simply evidence of how far the West has fallen — no-one is afraid of Jolly Olde England’s navy’s aircraft carrier without aircraft, or of a US Establishment which treats its elected President as the Anti-Christ.

    I feel for the people of Hong Kong — but we have our own problems to deal with in the West, many of which stem from the same issue of failing to keep up with China.  The Covid Scam revealed to us all that most of the medications in the West come from China — yet Democrats in Congress (“finest politicians money can buy“) are more concerned about making the Washington Swamp into a State than they are about taking the steps necessary to repatriate the manufacture of essential medications.

    The people of Hong Kong have benefitted mightily from their geographic position as the largely English-speaking gateway to China’s burgeoning economy.  There are different informed views on whether Hong Kongers are good … or simply lucky.  See, for example: https://spandrell.com/2019/08/25/hong-kong-and-the-perils-of-nativism/

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  10. Gavin Longmuir:
    Cool heads, everybody!  This was inevitable as soon as the sainted Margaret Thatcher relinquished the English claim to Hong Kong.  OK, the absorption into China was supposed to happen in 2047.

    This was completely predictable.  The only question was when, and I must say that it took longer than I expected.  I recall speaking to a lawyer in the mid-1990s who had lived and worked in Hong Kong for around a decade about the prospects after the turn-over.  To those who said “China will keep its hands off because they can’t afford losing the window on the West” he said, “Don’t believe it.  The way they think is that it may end in wreckage, but it will be our wreckage.”  This was, of course, before the tremendous ascendancy of China on the world industrial and financial stage, which has brought them to the point that they can probably afford to take the hit of losing Hong Kong, especially since their leverage over the West is such it’s unlikely they will face any really serious consequences.

    If they succeed in subduing and assimilating Hong Kong without paying a price, will they next turn their envious eyes toward Taiwan?

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  11. John W.  “If they succeed in subduing and assimilating Hong Kong without paying a price, will they next turn their envious eyes toward Taiwan?

    It is an excellent bet that China’s rulers will pay no price for whatever they do in Hong Kong, thanks to the dependence of the West on China for manufactured goods.  Given the Chinese sense of humor, it is easy to imagine them shipping 3 million Hong Kongers to England and dumping them on Boris Johnson’s unprepared doorstep, whether they want to go or not;  seems like another way to beat the West down.  Fly into Shanghai on a clear night, looking at the spectacular city lights, and the question inevitably pops into mind — Who needs Hong Kong anymore?

    As for Taiwan, China’s rulers could hardly have been clearer that they fully intend to bring Taiwan back into their fold.  In their minds, the independence of Taiwan is probably one of the last vestiges of the “Century of Humiliation” Europeans & Japanese visited upon China.  But we all should have learned by now that China’s rulers are patient, and they play their cards well.  My guess is that as the West continues its decline, and as Chinese money has the same effect on Taiwanese politicians as it has on Western politicians, Taiwan’s leadership will at some future date request incorporation into the People’s Republic — peacefully.

    For anyone keeping score (which apparently does not include the denizens of the US Congress), US warplanes cannot fly without computer chips made in Taiwan. Future historians are going to be perplexed that the West did not recognize the inevitable consequences of moving to a Cargo Cult economy, so heavily dependent on imported products from China.

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  12. John Walker:
    The U.S. should step up and offer to take the rest.  Hong Kong residents have a mean IQ of 108, tied with Singapore for highest in the world.

    Sadly, who have second-generation kids who reliably support the Democratic party.

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  13. John Walker:

    To those who said “China will keep its hands off because they can’t afford losing the window on the West” he said, “Don’t believe it.  The way they think is that it may end in wreckage, but it will be our wreckage.”

    I thought they’d keep their hands off because of the economy there and raise taxes but U.S. trade policies (pre-Trump) allowed them the luxury of destroying their biggest cash cow.

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  14. EThompson:

    John Walker:

    To those who said “China will keep its hands off because they can’t afford losing the window on the West” he said, “Don’t believe it.  The way they think is that it may end in wreckage, but it will be our wreckage.”

    I thought they’d keep their hands off because of the economy there and raise taxes but U.S. trade policies (pre-Trump) allowed them the luxury of destroying their biggest cash cow.

    It’s a bit different I think… Shanghai has been gradually replacing Hong Kong as the preeminent financial center, and the Guandong province has been absorbing the manufacturing, so while HK is big, it’s no longer their biggest cash cow.

    I still have family living there, and they’ve pretty much given up. It’s really sad.

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  15. EThompson:

    John Walker:

    To those who said “China will keep its hands off because they can’t afford losing the window on the West” he said, “Don’t believe it.  The way they think is that it may end in wreckage, but it will be our wreckage.”

    I thought they’d keep their hands off because of the economy there and raise taxes but U.S. trade policies (pre-Trump) allowed them the luxury of destroying their biggest cash cow.

    This was the Thomas Friedman view of China. As wrong as he has been about everything, he still seems to have a column at the NYT. On second thought, it’s not surprising after all.

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  16. ET:  “I thought they’d keep their hands off because of the economy there and raise taxes but U.S. trade policies (pre-Trump) allowed them the luxury of destroying their biggest cash cow.”

    Macao serves an important role for China as the Las Vegas of the South China Sea, but it has probably been quite a few years since Hong Kong was China’s biggest cash cow.  Hong Kong may be more of a problem for China by serving as a route for capital flight.

    I strongly recommend Pillsbury’s “Hundred Year Marathon” for anyone with an interest in how the future may develop.  China’s rulers are intent on making sure the “Century of Humiliation” can never happen again.  That makes Hong Kong a real burr under their saddles — a living reminder of European exploitation of China.

    Imagine what (non-Democrat) Americans would be thinking if the American Revolution had ended with Manhattan Island still in English hands, and Manhattan had then prospered for decades while America languished?  When that hypothetical America finally got its act together and caught up economically with England, damn sure Americans would have wanted Manhattan back!  Even if we did not need it.

    Same logic applies to Taiwan.  And as the West continues to shot itself in the foot, the head, the heart while China becomes economically stronger, better educated, and takes the lead in cutting-edge technology, a growing number of people in Taiwan are going to want to join the winning side.  We should not blame the Chinese for what we in the West are doing to ourselves — rather, it is time to start getting our own act together.

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  17. Gavin Longmuir:
    Macao serves an important role for China as the Las Vegas of the South China Sea, but it has probably been quite a few years since Hong Kong was China’s biggest cash cow.

    That was my point. Pre-1997  this would have been the case but we have been all too helpful in supporting China’s economic growth. I’m still incensed that Trump was the first U.S. president to call them out on currency manipulation.

    Too late now.

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