A Japanese Health Club

It is hard to explain to someone who had not lived here the amount of stairs that are in this country. There are stairs and there are stairs. I am posting some stairs I saw from a road AKA alley in the States.
This is from the road level.

This is at the top of the third flight of steps.

This is at the top. I didn’t go up there but it looks like one goes up at least five flights to get to this house.

In the first picture there are blue plastic bags. Those are trash bags to be picked up by the city garbage truck. I mention this to illustrate that living up all those steps means carrying things up and down those steps. One has to be in good shape to do that day in and day out.
These stairs are easy. They are wide and well made. Some stairs I have seen seem more like ladders than anything else. I think the only way you descend those is backwards.
I wonder what age one has to stop living at the top of these stairs. 60? 70? 80? One thing is for sure if your BMI is high there is a fat chance you will be climbing these often.

How often do you climb stairs in the wild (outside an office building)? How flights do you think you climb a day?

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7 thoughts on “A Japanese Health Club”

  1. It looks like no one climbs stairs anymore. Here there didn’t used to be a lot of escalators so going on trains to anywhere meant climbing up stairs to an elevated railway or down stairs to a subway. Then walks to those stations would be at least 10 minutes each way. It is a cheap “health club” but it works.

    I knew a couple that decided to live in a five story walk up on the fifth floor to keep in shape. This isn’t bad till age make going up and down too much. I remember walking up some stairs with the wife when I was quite a bit younger. I was struggling but she wasn’t.

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  2. Americans would do well having to climb more stairs. I was at my most fit in NYC because I took 3 subways to work and climbed up and down numerous flights at a rather rapid pace (in stilettos) to keep up with the crowd and avoid being run over. 🙂

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  3. 10 Cents,  I do not know of a large city in America with lots of long outdoor staircases.  I lived many years in Knoxville.  Short runs of steps are common.  But to go up the side of a mountain, either suck it up and hike the steep trail, or else take the street on a very long switchback alignment.

    I guess there might be similar situations in Pittsburgh or maybe San Francisco.

    Where I live it is pretty flat.

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  4. MJBubba:
    10 Cents,  I do not know of a large city in America with lots of long outdoor staircases.  I lived many years in Knoxville.  Short runs of steps are common.  But to go up the side of a mountain, either suck it up and hike the steep trail, or else take the street on a very long switchback alignment.

    I guess there might be similar situations in Pittsburgh or maybe San Francisco.

    Where I live it is pretty flat.

    Hey, you live in flight over country which is flat.

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  5. My wife and I live in a very small house – a log home built in 1803.  The one flight of steps doesn’t present a problem, until it does.

    In the last 5 years, my wife and I have both separately had physical problems that prevented us from going up and down for a month or so.  The  problem is that the kitchen (input) is downstairs and the bathroom (output) is upstairs.  It is a solvable problem, but the mobile part of the team does a lot of climbing up and down.

    I had figured that we were within a couple of years of moving to a retirement home, but all of the Covid issues make me think it will be worth it to put on an addition that would make single level living an option.

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  6. WillowSpring:
    My wife and I live in a very small house – a log home built in 1803.  The one flight of steps doesn’t present a problem, until it does.

    In the last 5 years, my wife and I have both separately had physical problems that prevented us from going up and down for a month or so.  The  problem is that the kitchen (input) is downstairs and the bathroom (output) is upstairs.  It is a solvable problem, but the mobile part of the team does a lot of climbing up and down.

    I had figured that we were within a couple of years of moving to a retirement home, but all of the Covid issues make me think it will be worth it to put on an addition that would make single level living an option.

    I’d love to see a picture!

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