U.S. Chamber of Globalists

I can remember not so many decades ago when the U.S. Chamber of Commerce was considered a safely Republican outfit.  Republican policy was pro-business, and Republicans won routine endorsements from the Chamber.

But the interests of the Republican Party and the U.S. Chamber have diverged.  To a large extent, the U.S. Chamber is now Center-Left, while the GOP has become more conservative, over the very loud protestations of a small number of Nevers.

Which brings us to the current slate of endorsements by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.  Eight Republicans and six Democrats.

https://www.uschamber.com/press-release/us-chamber-announces-latest-political-endorsements

The Chamber told NPR that this is due to a number of Democrat freshmen from the class of 2018 who tried hard to vote pro-business.

https://www.npr.org/2020/09/19/914073820/nations-largest-business-lobby-backs-vulnerable-democrats-for-reelection

The Chamber is technically a nonpartisan organization, but its pro-business agenda has historically aligned it more closely with Republicans. And it still is: This year the group is endorsing more than six times as many Republicans (192) than Democrats (30) in the U.S. House of Representatives for reelection. However, most of the Republicans who got the endorsement are running in safe seats, while most of the Democrats who were endorsed are in swing seats that will determine control of the House this November.

As the national Chamber became increasingly oriented towards the ‘Forbes 100’ it has also increasingly lost touch with America.

I was very pleased that President Trump recognized in the 2016 campaign that the U.S. Chamber was unreliable and favored policies that help Big Bidness widen their moats that protect them from small businesses.   It put a big smile on my face to see Team Trump talking to the Small Business Council and not returning calls from the U.S. Chamber.

11+
avataravataravataravataravataravataravataravataravataravataravatar

10 thoughts on “U.S. Chamber of Globalists”

  1. “Chamber-of-Commerce Republicans” has become an insult, rightly so, much like “RINO” and “neocon.” These groups have been hostile to the objectives of most Republicans for a long time. It’s not clear if their interests were ever aligned but it is clear that they are not aligned now. Yet we still have many normie-cons who are living in the past, imagining that these fifth columnists are still on their side and cheering them on even as they seek to undermine American society.

    One of the most important challenges going forward is to convince normies that Woke Capital actually hates them. The George Floyd/BLM/Antifa phenomenon has had a great clarifying effect. Most large corporations are now fully converged, loud and proud. The following describes many, if not most, of the familiar names in contemporary corporate America:

    The corporation devotes significant resources to social causes that have absolutely nothing to do with its core business activities. Human Resources is transformed into a full Inquisition, imposing its policies without restraint and striking fear into everyone from the Chairman of the Board on down. The CEO regularly mouths social justice platitudes in the place of corporate strategies and the marketing materials are so full of virtue-signaling and social justice advocacy that it becomes difficult to tell from them what the company actually does or sells. The corporation now shows open contempt for its customers.

    6+
    avataravataravataravataravataravatar
  2. I figured out the Chamber of Commerce back when Rubio betrayed his constituents as part of the “Gang of Eight” for immigration “reform”.  Since then, a Chamber of Commerce endorsement has been a warning sign for me.

    7+
    avataravataravataravataravataravataravatar
  3. Phil Turmel:
    I figured out the Chamber of Commerce back when Rubio betrayed his constituents as part of the “Gang of Eight” for immigration “reform”.  Since then, a Chamber of Commerce endorsement has been a warning sign for me.

    Yes me too

    2+
    avataravatar
  4. There is not a single institution of power that one could point to and say it is acting in the best interest of Main Street Americans. My rule of thumb is that if it was started in the late Victorian era it is likely now globalist and leftist because that is what it was from the beginning. We face a serious threat now and it transcends Trump or the election. In this decade Americans will either willing continue to put on the chains before them or they will fight back. We face blood thirsty leftists on one side and pigs on the other side more interested in their portfolios than the state of freedom for their fellow countrymen.

    7+
    avataravataravataravataravataravataravatar
  5. MJBubba:
    As the national Chamber became increasingly oriented towards the ‘Forbes 100’ it has also increasingly lost touch with America. I was very pleased that President Trump recognized in the 2016 campaign that the U.S. Chamber was unreliable and favored policies that help Big Bidness widen their moats that protect them from small businesses.   It put a big smile on my face to see Team Trump talking to the Small Business Council and not returning calls from the U.S. Chamber.

    Small businesses aren’t all they’re cracked up to be. Yes, big business is an exercise in O’Sullivan’s Law. But much of small business is an exercise in the tragedy of the commons.

    Although big business hires H1-B workers, small business is often where the illegal aliens work (restaurants, landscaping companies, small markets…). The small business owners benefit from the low wages, while residential and other taxpayers foot the bill for the externalities of illegal immigration.

    3+
    avataravataravatar
  6. ctlaw:

    MJBubba:
    As the national Chamber became increasingly oriented towards the ‘Forbes 100’ it has also increasingly lost touch with America. I was very pleased that President Trump recognized in the 2016 campaign that the U.S. Chamber was unreliable and favored policies that help Big Bidness widen their moats that protect them from small businesses.   It put a big smile on my face to see Team Trump talking to the Small Business Council and not returning calls from the U.S. Chamber.

    Small businesses aren’t all they’re cracked up to be. Yes, big business is an exercise in O’Sullivan’s Law. But much of small business is an exercise in the tragedy of the commons.

    Although big business hires H1-B workers, small business is often where the illegal aliens work (restaurants, landscaping companies, small markets…). The small business owners benefit from the low wages, while residential and other taxpayers foot the bill for the externalities of illegal immigration.

    Agreed.

    The Small Business Council guys all agree that their peers hire illegals for work because they are available.  What they wanted was a level playing field.  If the supply of illegals gets tight, they will hire legal workers, and pick up the bureaucratic and tax costs that go along with that.  So long as everyone is in the same boat they should work out fine.  The Small Business Council supported President Trump on immigration.

    2+
    avataravatar
  7. ctlaw:  “But much of small business is an exercise in the tragedy of the commons.

    Notice that much of Big Business is also deeply involved in demonstrating the Tragedy of the Commons.

    A Big Business (eg Apple) offshores its manufacturing.  Short-sighted “free traders” say this benefits the US consumer by making goods cheaper (although iPhones seem to be an exception).  There is some truth in the “free traders” delusion — some people benefit as consumers, but other people lose jobs while governments lose tax revenues and the country loses its skill base.  For each individual company, offshoring may make sense.  But when every company offshores, the population will be left impoverished, without jobs, skills, or hope — unable even to afford the cheap imported goods.

    It exactly parallels the traditional Tragedy of the Commons:  near-term benefits to some individuals will bring longer-term costs to everyone — including those who initially benefitted.

    5+
    avataravataravataravataravatar
  8. https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/rick-moran/2020/09/30/chaos-at-u-s-chamber-of-commerce-over-groups-shift-to-the-left-n988368

    The long-time political strategist of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has resigned following a lurch to the left by the group’s leadership. Scott Reed told Politico he could “no longer be part of this institution as it moves left.”  …

    But the Chamber of Commerce says that Reed did not resign, he was fired “for cause.”  …

    House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy said he would no longer accept support from the Chamber and several high-profile donors to the group have severed ties.

    But it appears that the Chamber leadership, including CEO Tom Donohue, would rather switch than fight. Are they hoping that liberal Democrats eat them last?

    3+
    avataravataravatar
  9. MJBubba: [quoting PJ Media]
    The long-time political strategist of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has resigned following a lurch to the left by the group’s leadership.

    I’m not so sure left/right is the relevant axis in this instance. Globalists/nationalists, Anywheres/Somewheres, metropolitans/provincials are better descriptors. Derb has a few more. People from the legacy left and right don’t fall neatly into these new categories, with many on the old left also rejecting globalism.

    One of the many errors normiecons make is to remain stuck in the past, still relying on that outdated taxonomy. This is how we get normiecons defending Google, Twitter, and Facebook with the muh private companies argument as these entities seek to destroy the country. Somehow, it never occurs to them that they are on the same side as the neoliberal globalists who came from the left side of the political spectrum.

    3+
    avataravataravatar

Leave a Reply