Touch the future

I put messages in bottles into the oceans through volunteers. 200+ years seal. Messages are inside aluminum foil against sunlight. Champagne bottles are too large for fauna to swallow and survive shingle beach landings. I desire the South Pacific Gyre.

Arctic messages in bottles
Being dropped 01 -10 October 2020.

If you access eastern New Zealand, western Peru or Chile…I’ll ship 12 to 48 messages bottles on my nickel. Each holds my message and another sheet. Three sides can be your, dropper, or student messages added before sealing, 36 to 144 piggybacked messages. Click anywhere on the map to explore.

East of Christchurch, Wellington, NE Chatham Island (avoid Motuhara). West of Lima; Antofogasta, Valparaiso.

http://plasticadrift.org/?lat=-43.466&lng=173.757&center=-109.8
http://plasticadrift.org/?lat=-42.130&lng=175.105&center=-109.8
http://plasticadrift.org/?lat=-43.084&lng=-175.533&center=-109.8

http://plasticadrift.org/?lat=-11.968&lng=-78.058&center=-109.8
http://plasticadrift.org/?lat=-23.468&lng=-71.743&center=-109.8
http://plasticadrift.org/?lat=-32.907&lng=-72.405&center=-109.8

https://www.lancelin.com.au/news/worlds-oldest-message-bottle-found-near-lancelin/
… Set a world record for message bottle drop to recovery, now 131.6 years. We will do better (given patience).

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23 thoughts on “Touch the future”

  1. Could you say a few words about how the bottles are sealed against invasion by seawater and degradation of seals over more than century?  I’d just heat the neck of the bottle to plasticity in a gas fire and pinch it, like vacuum tube seals, but I suppose that’s cheating.

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  2. Better beware of the EPA. You could be committing an environmental offense. If one of those champagne bottles that was emptied by one of those “white privileged” types should hit a dolphin in the snout, all hell could break loose.

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  3. Gavin Longmuirsays:
    #1 2020-09-30 at 21:19 UTC  [Quote]

    Do you need volunteers to help empty the champagne bottles?

    “8^>)  I still have 150 bottles cleaned, dried, weighed, and stored.  I hit every plop of saltwater less the Mediterranean (why bother?) and the South Atlantic and Pacific Gyres (Enviro-whiner difficult).  My two favorite  landings are

    1) Kwajalein Atoll.  Security ground check recovered  shortly before a dummy ICBM warhead from Vandenberg AFB uncreated its location.  I’m not sure how to score that.

    2) Manus Island, 18 years!  Air-dropped 50 miles east of Point Conception, CA it got caught in the North Pacific Gyre.  It was recovered while Manus was Australia’s “secret” detention and interrogation, ah, facility.  That’s chuckles given Australia”s colonization.

    I likely have some 60 bottles grounded in Antarctica.  The oceanographer thought two years’ drops were a hoot during the commute, 56° – 58°S and the Prime Meridian, to orbit the Earth.  Afterward…

    https://phys.org/news/2018-07-reveals-foreign-kelp-surfed-antarctica.html
    …all the southerly drift models were wrong.  Kelp beat me to it!  Dr. Erik van Sebille’s model is good to me from Greenland’s Fram Strait  to Tasmania.  It fails in the Arctic and the Southern Ocean.  Therefore…

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  4. John Walkersays:
    #3 2020-09-30 at 21:52 UTC  [Quote]

    Could you say a few words about how the bottles are sealed against invasion by seawater and degradation of seals over more than century?  I’d just heat the neck of the bottle to plasticity in a gas fire and pinch it, like vacuum tube seals, but I suppose that’s cheating.

    Soda-lime glass differentially thermally shatters.  Were there discarded Pyrex heavy wall bottles, I’d pull a vacuum and make a bishop’s mitre seal.  I did those for sealing vacuum free radical polymerizations.  Things that work are Quality Control, and unstable.  Things that cannot fail are Quality Assurance, and substantive.

    [caption id="attachment_43738" align="alignnone" width="348"]Message bottle seal Message bottle sawn in half.[/caption]

    Sunlight eats organics.  Saltwater eats metals.  Alternate with glass fiber/epoxy reinforcement to prevent common mode failure/vertical cracking.  An Inconel 686 crown cap would be better and faster, but probably not less expensive.  I’ve aged neck seals and components  in a quart of Pacific seawater and naked on my Soviet of California red tile roof for ten years (the enameled bottle lid died).  Full south-facing sun routinely hits 50° C, and higher in midsummer.  The black boot gets a little scuffed.

    [caption id="attachment_43739" align="alignnone" width="230"]Message bottle seal components 12 – 24 bottles in seven days.[/caption]

    I worked with an engineer who never nailed wood when he could glue and screw.  “I build forever.” Quality Assurance.

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  5. EThompsonsays:
    #4 2020-09-30 at 22:11 UTC  [Quote]

    Better beware of the EPA. You could be committing an environmental offense. If one of those champagne bottles that was emptied by one of those “white privileged” types should hit a dolphin in the snout, all hell could break loose.

    We received the below message from XXX of the University of XXX regarding your request for individuals to drop bottles in the Southern Ocean.  Countries, including the United States, have designated Antarctica as a natural reserve devoted to peace and science, and seek to ensure that any human activity is minor or transient.

    The Antarctic Treaty and its Environmental Protocol establish obligations on the Treaty Parties (such as the United States) with regard to activities in the Antarctic Treaty area (i.e., the area south of 60˚ South Latitude).  As Mr. Gray said, all activities undertaken in Antarctica must have an environmental impact assessment.  Additionally, Article VII(5)(a) of the Treaty obliges each Party to give Advance Notification of all expeditions to and within Antarctica, on the part of its ships or nationals, and all expeditions to Antarctica organized in or proceeding from its territory.  The Antarctic Conservation Act, as amended, incorporates into U.S. regulations the environmental standards set forth by the Environmental Protocol.

    To start the process of complying with the Antarctic Treaty, Environmental Protocol, and Antarctic Conservation Act, please complete and return to me via email the Advance Notification Form DS-4131.  The U.S. Department of State, in consultation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. National Science Foundation, will then determine whether the proposed activity is subject to U.S. jurisdiction.  If we determine that it falls under U.S. jurisdiction, we will provide information on how to proceed with the documentation process required by the Environmental Protection Agency and National Science Foundation, including the environmental impact assessment and waste permits.  The process of complying with these requirements can take months, so we encourage you to start this process well in advance of undertaking the proposed activity in Antarctica.

    Thank you for your assistance with maintaining Antarctica for peace and science.

    William Muntean
    Senior Advisor,
    Antarctica
    U.S. Department of State Department

    Mr. Muntean in his personal capacity is in fact a rather accomplished fellow.  I sent him a scholarly reference to Australia abandoning 60 tonnes of waste when it shut down an Antarctic research outpost.  I inquired when that would be subject to regulatory review.  I informally wish Dr. Loose Lips intractable chronic constipation.

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  6. Uncle Al:
    Countries, including the United States, have designated Antarctica as a natural reserve devoted to peace and science, and seek to ensure that any human activity is minor or transient.

    Antarctica was originally explored with the invaluable aid of sled dogs, who hauled people and cargo across the icebound continent.  After the adoption of a Guilt for Existing® protocol in 1994, all non-human species were banned from Antarctica, which means, for example, that those who over-winter in Antarctic stations not only cannot have canine mascots, but are prohibited from even having potted plants, as they are “non-native species”.

    I used to be puzzled by the Fermi paradox.  Now, I just say,  “enstupidation” and move on.

    Well, at least the precautionary principle has saved us from the Philodendron that Devoured Antarctica.

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  7. Uncle Al:

    EThompsonsays:
    #4 2020-09-30 at 22:11 UTC

    Better beware of the EPA. You could be committing an environmental offense. If one of those champagne bottles that was emptied by one of those “white privileged” types should hit a dolphin in the snout, all hell could break loose.

    We received the below message from XXX of the University of XXX regarding your request for individuals to drop bottles in the Southern Ocean.  Countries, including the United States, have designated Antarctica as a natural reserve devoted to peace and science, and seek to ensure that any human activity is minor or transient.

    The Antarctic Treaty and its Environmental Protocol establish obligations on the Treaty Parties (such as the United States) with regard to activities in the Antarctic Treaty area (i.e., the area south of 60˚ South Latitude).  As Mr. Gray said, all activities undertaken in Antarctica must have an environmental impact assessment.  Additionally, Article VII(5)(a) of the Treaty obliges each Party to give Advance Notification of all expeditions to and within Antarctica, on the part of its ships or nationals, and all expeditions to Antarctica organized in or proceeding from its territory.  The Antarctic Conservation Act, as amended, incorporates into U.S. regulations the environmental standards set forth by the Environmental Protocol.

    To start the process of complying with the Antarctic Treaty, Environmental Protocol, and Antarctic Conservation Act, please complete and return to me via email the Advance Notification Form DS-4131.  The U.S. Department of State, in consultation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. National Science Foundation, will then determine whether the proposed activity is subject to U.S. jurisdiction.  If we determine that it falls under U.S. jurisdiction, we will provide information on how to proceed with the documentation process required by the Environmental Protection Agency and National Science Foundation, including the environmental impact assessment and waste permits.  The process of complying with these requirements can take months, so we encourage you to start this process well in advance of undertaking the proposed activity in Antarctica.

    Thank you for your assistance with maintaining Antarctica for peace and science.

    William Muntean
    Senior Advisor,
    Antarctica
    U.S. Department of State Department

    I’m sorry I asked. 🙂

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  8. We gotta work out that SpaceX piggyback launch and Jupiter gravity well slingshot to get a really long hang time.  “I’m in with the Oort cloud!”

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  9. [caption id="attachment_43746" align="alignnone" width="321"] Maker’s Mark molten “wax” seal. Eh.[/caption]

    [caption id="attachment_43747" align="alignnone" width="300"]Australia Down Under recover[/caption]

    [caption id="attachment_43750" align="alignnone" width="351"]The Message Message less bottle, plus three discrete security measures[/caption]

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  10. 10 Centssays:
    #14 2020-10-01 at 03:30 UTC  [Quote]

    This project is optimistic in thinking people will be able to read in the future. Are stick figures and emoticons allowed?

    Aside from the two gyres’ placements, I have one more curiosity and with mild academic support: pressure-sealed bottles with anchors on nylon lines, above crush depth, placed out of fishing areas. That is estimated 600-years to release – no light, cold water, eventual nylon tensile failure though hydrolysis.  What you say to ~2600 AD, and how?  Spacefaring race, genetically re-engineered humanity, or butts squatting in mud?

    Include a glossy drop-in Carl’s Jr. discount coupon sheet for burgers and fries.  “Look what we had.”  That seemed frivolous at first but, hey, in the fullness of time it’s clever.  The burger may well be the apotheosis of mankind.

    Same seal, glass microbubbles replaced by glass microshot, and a steel disk atop the crown cap to prevent inward collapse.  Given known burst pressure – 400+ psi for 900g bottles, crush depth is bracketed.  Folks who do crush depth studies for petroleum hardware, exploration, and military were very cold toward doing a champagne bottle.  Recovered wine aboard the Titanic had its corks pushed in, balancing differential pressure.

    Half the fun is in the pursuit.  So it can’t be done, so what?  Sabotage leviathan septic bureaucracies of the coercive state with laughter.

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  11. For something targeted for recovery in 2600 AD, it would probably be smart to include an explanation in Chinese — because that is the way the wind is blowing.

    A lot will have changed in 600 years time, but Matt Ridley’s “Rational Optimist” suggests that the human race will continue to move onwards & upwards, even if Western civilization goes the way of the Pharaohs.   Since the Laws of Physics are immutable, China in 2600 AD will have plentiful power from nuclear fission, and will manufacture liquid petroleum fuels from renewable wood & water — still the best fuels for heavy construction equipment, airplanes, ships, automobiles.  There will be a limited amount of space mining of very high value materials.

    Europe & the Americas will have limited populations focused on farming for the Chinese market and on tourism.  No-one will care much about whatever is happening in Africa or the Middle East outside of some well-protected Chinese enclaves.  China’s people will be significantly smarter, stronger, healthier than today, thanks to major advances in understanding of biology and some very hard-nosed attitudes to reproduction and end-of-life.  Human beings outside China will generally have degraded from today over the intervening 30 generations.  The total population of the planet will be significantly lower than today.  And intelligent people will worry about when China’s leaders are going to fumble the ball and screw up the good life.

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  12. Gavin Longmuir:
    For something targeted for recovery in 2600 AD, it would probably be smart to include an explanation in Chinese — because that is the way the wind is blowing.

    I take your point while retaining skepticism about China’s capability and future. Much of their recent development has been of the Potemkin Village variety; they lie about everything and GDP is no exception. Furthermore, they’re not an innovative people. The last time they came up with anything was a millennium or so ago: paper and gunpowder. Okay, there’s also spaghetti. What have they come up with lately? Mostly, they just copy and steal from the West. After the West collapses, who remains to rip off?

    If you’re happy to live in the world of the year 1000, China’s your wellspring of invention. Until relatively recently, China was stuck in a previous epoch. The only reason that they have anything resembling a modern society is because the West gave them the tools. Too bad for the Chinese people that they kept the feudal political organization instead of adopting Western ideas.

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  13. [opening a bottle]
    “It appears that the smartest person on the planet was a man named Uncle Al who ruled in  the western half of the globe.  If we only had a time machine to visit his palatial home or more importantly his wine cellars.”

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  14. 10 Centssays:
    #18 2020-10-01 at 22:14 UTC  [Quote]

    [opening a bottle]
    “It appears that the smartest person on the planet was a man named Uncle Al who ruled in  the western half of the globe.  If we only had a time machine to visit his palatial home or more importantly his wine cellars.”

    Second smartest.  Lead from behind, where the assassin must throw the bolt to reload.   It is not yours if somebody else can take it from you.

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  15. Have you ever Google Translated something into Chinese?  There is no future tense, no definite articles.  The syntax is impenetrable.  It is a truly awful way to communicate.  Korea long ago threw up it hands in disgust and commissioned a scholar to create a synthetic written language.  Hangul is magnificent!  Korean itself…well, not so much.

    English is a Northern language independent of Latin.  While the English Court pranced about in French, the hoi polloi created a minimal basis, remarkably powerful condensed simplified language that was a glutton for all that was good in other languages.  We sacrificed spelling for clarity.  Go the other way, French and Hebrew, for Commissions that keep the language “pure.”  A scholarly Israeli kid discovers a universe of Israeli Torah-derived nouns abandon him in the real world.

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  16. Uncle Al:

    10 Centssays:
    #18 2020-10-01 at 22:14 UTC

    [opening a bottle]
    “It appears that the smartest person on the planet was a man named Uncle Al who ruled in  the western half of the globe.  If we only had a time machine to visit his palatial home or more importantly his wine cellars.”

    Second smartest.  Lead from behind, where the assassin must throw the bolt to reload.   It is not yours if somebody else can take it from you.

    First there was clay tablets. Then papyrus. Paper. Radio. Television. Faxes. Email. Then the second smartest person in the world created Champagne Messaging. It was his magnum opus.

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  17. Uncle Al:  “The only reason that they [China] have anything resembling a modern society is because the West gave them the tools.”

    To be a little more complete — the West loaned China the money and gave China the technology to build the factory which made ropes that China then sold to the West so that the West could go hang itself.   Western leaders were so happy with this deal that they gave themselves bonuses before slipping the nooses around their own necks.

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  18. Gavin Longmuir:
    Uncle Al:  “The only reason that they [China] have anything resembling a modern society is because the West gave them the tools.”

    Ahem… you were quoting me.

    Gavin Longmuir:
    To be a little more complete — the West loaned China the money

    Seems to me we have been borrowing from China, not lending to them.

    Gavin Longmuir:
    …and gave China the technology to build the factory

    That’s what I meant by “the West gave them the tools.”

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