60 thoughts on “Tucker interviews Tony Bobulinski”

  1. EThompson:

    Robert A. McReynolds:

    drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    I don’t care what Zoom’s politics may be and know that it has provided me income to put right back into the American economy.

    And that is precisely what keeps this country strong, powerful and safe.

    I enjoy the juxtaposition of these two thoughts: pirate globalists working for our enemies while creating an asset bubble keeps this country strong, powerful, and safe.

    The remarkable thing about NormieCons is not that they are still living in the 1980s; it’s that they’ll be the first ones up against the wall when the revolution comes but don’t know it.

    Never mind the fact that many big Wall Street sweet heart companies have benefited greatly from access to a 4.25 trillion dollar line of credit due tot the Covid relief passed in March. The market that she is crowing about is not real growth but artificial growth spurred on by complicit politicians and the bankers who control the FED.

    I have zero problems with lines of credit and you are obviously not a businessman. LOCs help develop real growth particularly with my pet Zoom that provides critical products in time of need.

    Just curious: Do you dislike all success? Is there any profitable company that merits your approval? Or is it that you simply resent those who change the world?

    I’m afraid to ask what you think about Henry Ford, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Mellon or Steve Jobs. (I’d mention Mark Z and Bill Gates but you’ve made your thoughts clear on those two “robber barons.”)

    Your question exposes just how brain dead you are and how much of a stock jobber you are. Success? You mean like the family owned Italian joint here in Bear, Delaware, that is delicious and had to squeak through the early days of the pandemic during the lock down while massive chains weathered the storm through the stupid bail out Congress offered up in March? Yeah I like those guys and they are nice people to boot.

    Ford and Carnegie were decent folk. JDR after he made his millions manipulated government to protect his millions like JP Morgan. Don’t know much about Mellon.

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  2. Robert A. McReynolds:
    Direct me to an actual good that I can purchase that YOU created that isn’t a fund, a security, or a note.

    Investing in and creating cash flow for businesses like Zoom that provide critical products in times of crisis is very important.

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  3. A purist would say that the only person who actually invests in a company is the one who buys shares in an IPO;  that cash goes to the company, and is invested in the business.   When someone buys a share from an existing owner, it is simply a transaction between the buyer & seller which does not give the company any cash.

    Day traders serve a useful function in the market by providing lubrication.  Since every seller of an existing stock  needs a buyer (and vice versa), traders help to keep the stock market liquid, in contrast to (say) real estate where markets can be illiquid for extended periods and it can be difficult for sellers to find a buyer.  But the trading of stock does not create value — it simply changes who is currently holding cash and who is holding stock certificates.  Value is created in the business, when it invests to increase its productive capacity and raise the value of its products.  An increasing stock price can help the business to borrow money for investment, but does not directly yield investable cash for the company.

    Rockefeller created value by investing in wells & refineries to make the oil business more efficient.  Carnegie did the same thing in the steel business.  If memory serves, Carnegie had struggles with his investors who wanted him to pay dividends so that the stock price would go up — but Carnegie insisted instead on reinvesting the profits in new & improved steel plants instead of paying out the cash to stockholders.  That was genuine value creation.  Sadly, in an excessively financialized economy, there is too much focus on goosing the stock price instead of investing in the productive capabilities of the business.

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  4. I don’t mind success but I do mind when those billionaires decide to use their money to socially engineer society. I mean the Rockefeller Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and George Soros and his pet projects to destroy western civilization. This also includes Mike Bloomberg who was paying felons debts so that they can vote in Florida and Mark Zuckerberg who is also using his billions to affect the election.
    This is what we mean by an oligarchy

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  5. John Walker:
    Rudy Giuliani is on fire.  (One naughty word in the tweet, but I can’t find another to embed without one.)

    Rudy’s New York is coming out. He was holding back some potty words that is for sure. But his point about how  Joe Biden was using his drug addict son to do this stuff for him, really highlights how degenerate of a human being he is  (and I think his brother too.) If Joe Biden wins what does that say about this country? That with all of this evidence people are still willing to vote for him.

    Did you ever read that Greek Play The Bacchae? For revenge The god Dionysius, drives the women of Thebes mad, by their worship. Anyway long story short, the King’s mother in a fit of hysteria from her Dionysian worship kills her son, the King. Still in a crazed state she brings her son’s head to her father believing it to be a lions head., and doesn’t understand her father’s horror. As the fog of madness begins to wear off she realizes that the head she thought was a lion’s head is actually that of her son. Of course she is devastated and she and the other women are sent into exile. But there is a lesson with that story and Joe Biden. In his craze for wealth and power, he destroyed his own son, and he probably doesn’t even realize it and probably never will. What a tragedy.

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  6. Hmmm…perhaps censorship, abuse of customers, overt favouritism over ideology, covert suppression of speech, and having a homeless stoner with a nose ring as your CEO…

    Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifying to the Senate Commerce Committee

    …isn’t the best business strategy, after all.

    Twitter stock chart 2020-10-30

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  7. Robert A. McReynolds:
    Ford and Carnegie were decent folk. JDR after he made his millions manipulated government to protect his millions like JP Morgan. Don’t know much about Mellon.

    This is  how much you know:

    JP Morgan got nailed by monopoly laws and had to split up his companies. Fortunately, he had enough money to become a major stock holder in all of the off-shoots and became richer than ever.

    Ha! Never try to pull one over on an accomplished entrepreneur particularly if you work in the Swamp.

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  8. drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    Robert A. McReynolds:

    Show them what happens when “private” businesses overtly act to benefit one political party over another in an election year.

    Why the “quotations”? FB is a private company and one can choose to invest in it or not. Remember the First Amendment?

    I also buy Penzey Spices because I love the product and that owner is a bona fide socialist. What do I care? I don’t give his opines the time of day; I just want the damn celery salt and lemon pepper.

    Try capitalism as opposed to fascism; you’ll eat better and make more money. And best of all, you might develop a more attractive personality.

    Signed,

    The Slag

    How’s that quaffing of babies’ blood going? (h/t Uncle Al, aka @alschwartz)

    You’ve used that one before; try another. (Yawn!)

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