And here we have NR not getting it

https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/mueller-investigation-arguments-for-ending-probe/

But I assume some of the Trump-defenders are sincere in their belief that Trump should end the investigation, and I assume they think this would be good for Trump. What I haven’t heard is a compelling argument for why it would be good for Trump — unless they think Mueller has found something or some things that would be even more politically damaging than the fallout from firing Mueller would be.

 

Heaven forfend, we just want an unjust investigation ended because it is wrong! Clearly, onlt eh enlightened Never Trumpers can do things based on their values. Only they are pure. Trump supporters are only souless, greedy calculators, bent on winning over all else.


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Stop giving the forces of the entrenched administrative system the benefit of the doubt.

http://amp.dailycaller.com/2018/05/18/clapper-fbi-spying-trump-campaign/

Clapper seems to think so. I am sure that the anti-Trump conservatives will also explain why it was right for a Democrat administration to use intelligence resources against an America who was running for President with the Republican party. If this Jeb! they would be outraged.

Of course, we can dismiss anyone unhappy with what happened as being starry-eyed Trumpkins. I mean, Andrew McCarthy sure falls into that circle, right?

https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/05/crossfire-hurricane-new-york-times-report-buries-lede/

What the Times story makes explicit, with studious understatement, is that the Obama administration used its counterintelligence powers to investigate the opposition party’s presidential campaign.

That is, there was no criminal predicate to justify an investigation of any Trump-campaign official. So, the FBI did not open a criminal investigation. Instead, the bureau opened a counterintelligence investigation and hoped that evidence of crimes committed by Trump officials would emerge. But it is an abuse of power to use counterintelligence powers, including spying and electronic surveillance, to conduct what is actually a criminal investigation

Every conservative should be outraged. It does not matter if you like Trump or not.

The scandal is that the FBI, lacking the incriminating evidence needed to justify opening a criminal investigation of the Trump campaign, decided to open a counterintelligence investigation. With the blessing of the Obama White House, they took the powers that enable our government to spy on foreign adversaries and used them to spy on Americans — Americans who just happened to be their political adversaries.

Obama used the power of the government to spy on Trump. If Watergate was wrong, and deserved the removal of a President, what does it say for the Obama White House to have authorized this? Obama did not just run a cover up after the fact, his administration started the spying.

It is long past time for all conservatives to stop giving the forces of the entrenched administrative system the benefit of the doubt.

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Working in the Wake

Working in the Wake: How Leaders Lose Their Focus

 Dr. T.P. Hall was a part time teacher in my Executive MBA program. Retired from the Georgia State School of Business, T.P. (as he asked us to call him) was every inch the seasoned old man who clearly loved to share his accumulated wisdom. One afternoon, he abandoned his Power Point presentation and spoke to us directly.

And I will always remember his words of advice:

“Cultivate your ignorance”

What T.P. was telling us was that we did not have to understand every detail of our subordinate’s jobs.  As growing executives our jobs were not to replace them, it was to manage and lead them.

Having come up through the ranks of my organization, I needed to hear and to listen to this advice.  I was supervising staffers who were doing jobs I used to do. In most cases, I felt I was able to jump in and show them how to do their jobs “right”.

That afternoon, T.P. changed the way I now think about being a manager and leader. He taught me that being a leader is not constantly jumping in with the employees to work alongside them. I had trained them and they knew how to do the job. My job was to hold them accountable and to clear barriers, to create an environment in which they could do their best work.  Jumping in simply kept me from doing the job my boss needed from me.

I call this jumping back “Wake Work”. If the leader is driving the boat forward, leaping into the boat’s wake means no one is in the drivers’ seat. Forward progress is checked, and things will soon start to drift. The higher level the leader, the bigger the drift.

In start-up companies, the leader doing Wake Work can inhibit the growth of the company. The founder is used to doing every function of the business. As it grows, the founder is less and less able to “do it all”, but still often tries and is unable to concentrate on the job of growing the business.

An enterprise can only grow if the founder can delegate others to work in the Wake or find someone else to drive the boat. The owner of a restaurant can hire a business developer while she remains the head chef. The founder of an IT company can hire someone to manage the business while he builds the relationships that lead to new clients.

Wake Work is an easy trap for a new leader, especially for those who are used to doing all the jobs. That goes double for perfectionists. New managers and leaders must learn to let go of unnecessary details and concentrate on driving their boats. It is important for experienced leaders to coach others to stay in the boat, and not jump into the wake.

“Cultivate your ignorance.” It is the only way to really lead.

Thanks, T.P.

Originally published at TalkForward

 

Bryan G. Stephens is an executive on a mission to transform the workplace. He is the founder and CEO of TalkForward, a consulting and training company, utilizing Bryan’s clinical and management expertise to develop managers and teams in a corporate environment. As a licensed therapist with strong understanding of developing human potential, he is dedicated to the development of Human Capital to meet the needs of leaders, managers, and employees in the 21st Century workplace.

Bryan has an Executive MBA from Kennesaw State University, Coles School of Business, and both a Master’s and Bachelor’s degree in Psychology.


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Attacks on Trump Supporters continues and is clearly insane

https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/donald-trump-evangelical-supporters-stormy-daniels/

I do not understand Never Trump. What do they hope to accomplish with attacks on Trump supporters. I get they hate Trump, but they cannot win back a party with attacking Trump voters. It does not add up.

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Apropos of our discussion last night: Gut Bacteria can Change the Brain

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43815370

The evidence linking the microbiome and the brain is as fascinating as it is early.

But the pioneers of this field see an exciting prospect on the horizon – a whole new way of influencing our health and wellbeing.

If microbes do influence our brains then maybe we can change our microbes for the better.


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From Commodity to Transformation

From Commodity to Transformation: How Selling Coffee Points the Way to the Future of Healthcare Delivery and Why it is So Hard to Get Right

Originally Published at TalkForward.com

In his 2006 book The Starbucks Experience: 5 Principles for Turning Ordinary Into Extraordinary, Joseph A. Michelli outlines how Starbucks takes a service (preparing coffee) and turns into an experience, a transformation that has not been without struggles and has proven difficult to maintain over time.

In the book, Michelli outlines the hierarchy of sales, showing that the highest margins are from those sales based on experience, using coffee as an example:

  • Commodity:   Coffee Beans
  • Product:         Coffee sold in the grocery store
  • Service:          Someone pours the coffee for you
  • Experience:   Going to get coffee becomes something special

The market sets the prices of commodities. There is little you can do to charge more and you are left to try to move them around as inexpensively as possible. For products, the competition from the other 17 brands of coffee sitting on the shelf next to you mean the margins are razor-thin. Services can have a higher price, even though it costs more to deliver.

When I worked at the Great American Cookie Company in the mall as a teen, a full pot of coffee cost us 20 cents. We sold each cup for 40 cents, and it was our highest margin item. When you add in the experience however, it allows you to sell coffee, not for a dollar or less, but for $3.45.

Starbucks does many things to move from a service to an experience. From the moment you walk in, there is the rich smell of a coffee house. The different types of drink have special names, and even the sizes are given special labels. When you order, a staffer asks your name, calls you by it, and adds it on your cup. If you are a regular, they know you and treat you, as one would expect from a small-town owner, rather than an international chain. You feel like a friend of the family.

The point Michelli makes is that people are willing to pay for the value of an experience that far exceeds the taste of the coffee. These days, many other outlets have good coffee. McDonald’s is one of them, but unless you are a youngster you are unlikely to be seeking a McDonald’s experience.

Disney World is another great example of the experience instead of the service. Disney charges families for the experience, far more than the services. In effect, Disney is selling memories of a great time. When Walt Disney created his first amusement park his mission was to “make people happy.” They have been consistently able to do that for decades. And they have been able to charge well for it.

In the old world of “Fee-for-Service” health care has been in a service model. That puts it into the category of McDonald’s is in from above. Services have been atomized into procedures, events, and things done to the patients. Often, processes are based on what works best for the system, and not the patients (or even the providers for that matter). The experience for patients and providers has been miserable.

Right now, Health Care providers are looking at the overall outcomes, including the patient experience. I believe this is the right direction, but I think experience, as hard as it is to achieve and maintain, is not the end goal. What the patients as customers want is nothing less than a use of products, services, and experiences that lead to transformations of their lives, a return to the fullest, least restrictive lives possible.

Providing that transformation requires success with the delivery of quality services and exceptional experience. That then becomes the new basic floor. Success in healthcare will be built on that foundation. Providers and employees at every level must be focused on the customers, their experiences, and invested in the effects of what they do, from the doctors to the cleaning staff.

Everyone is part of the transformation team, and that includes the customers and their families. Process need to support people and data needs to drive the process for the customers, as much as for the providers.

Transformation will be the most difficult thing to provide. It will require constant monitoring and change. Each department, and sometimes each customer will require individualized solutions. Technology must be used to provide the customization needed, just as it does with cell phones. When it is our turn to consume healthcare, all of us yearn to be seen as unique individuals.  All of us are seeking transformation from sickness to wellness.

It is time for healthcare providers to deliver.

 

Bryan G. Stephens is an executive on a mission to transform the workplace. He is the founder and CEO of TalkForward, a consulting and training company, utilizing Bryan’s clinical and management expertise to develop managers and teams in a corporate environment. As a licensed therapist with strong understanding of developing human potential, he is dedicated to the development of Human Capital to meet the needs of leaders, managers, and employees in the 21st Century workplace.

Bryan has an Executive MBA from Kennesaw State University, Coles School of Business, and both a Master’s and Bachelor’s degree in Psychology.

© 2018 Bryan G. Stephens

 


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