McInnes v. SPLC

Gavin McInnes sued SPLC in The US District Court for the Middle District of Alabama :
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1n-2URa1j3Kx58cIQeSvNH_P20lELIkdz/view

Interestingly there is a count for aiding and abetting employment discrimination under NY Labor Law § 201–d. This begs the question of whether he also sues Blaze TV in NY for that employment discrimination.

Another question is whether he could have included some form of unjust enrichment claim against SPLC.

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Mark Steyn’s hockey game goes into its 36th overtime

The District of Columbia Court of Appeal has revised two footnotes in its two year old opinion in the Michael Mann case. National Review and CEI have filed new petitions for rehearing en banc.

https://efile.dcappeals.gov/public/caseView.do?csIID=55550

This is a likely sign that they will shortly decide on the petitions.

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How do these people actually make it to space?

Russia is a weird place.

The first significant incident in the crew’s mission came in August when astronauts detected an air leak in their Soyuz spacecraft, which was docked to the orbiting space laboratory.

They sealed the small hole successfully but Russia launched an investigation and its space chief Dmitry Rogozin suggested it could have been deliberate sabotage carried out in space.

Rogozin said that investigators ruled out the possibility the defect was introduced during the spacecraft’s manufacture.

Prokopyev and fellow Russian Oleg Kononenko last week carried out a gruelling space walk lasting almost eight hours to locate the hole from the outside and record and bag evidence.

The hole was in a section of the astronauts’ spacecraft that was to fall away and burn up in the atmosphere as they landed, hence the need to carry out the probe in space.

During the space walk, Kononenko said there was some kind of black and yellow “furry” deposit that looked like a “spider” around the hole, but no conclusion has been made public.

Prokopyev brought back the evidence to Earth and will hand it to the FSB security service which will carry out laboratory analysis, TASS state news agency reported citing a source.

On the one hand, they can have a fairly effective space agency. On the other hand, its head can appear to be a Sacha Baron Cohen parody who is probably trying to figure out how a Jew sneaked aboard the ISS.

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CTLaw’s rules of Hollywood anachronism

I saw First Man last night.

It has the most severe and repeated instances of CTLaw’s rules of Hollywood anachronism that I have ever seen: in period films, Hollywood shows things as preserved versions of those things appear today.

In this film all of the Gemini and Apollo capsules and much of the other hardware is heavily patinaed as if they photographed those in the National Air and Space Museum and duplicated them including 50+ years of wear, decay, and dirt.

The rules work two ways. Certain things like the capsules in this film look much worse than they should. Others look much better.

Most things fall into the first category. The main example is buildings. If you watch a western many of the buildings appear old. This is despite the fact that the Wild West period only lasted about 15 years.  Building interiors are a key thing to notice for more recent films. For example, a World War II movie may show a room in the just-built Pentagon appearing to have about 15 coats of paint on the walls.  Another is concrete. Concrete is often shown heavily weathered, perhaps even covered with moss and lichen even in films where it would still have been curing at the time. Consider any film about the Normandy invasion. German fortifications would have been about a year old but are usually shown heavily  weathered and worn.

Firearms and military equipment work in the same direction.  Fresh troops in World War II will be shown receiving a hodgepodge of rifles with their stocks showing decades of wear and oil and the parkerising unevenly worn from the metal. As with the space capsules, combat aircraft which should be only a few weeks out of the factory reflect decades of use.

It was one thing when a WW II film made in the 1960s had to use 20-year-old equipment without special effects. It’s another thing when a 21st-century film uses CGI   and nonsensically replicates 70 years of decay.

The main example of things that look better on screen than they should is automobiles. Few people preserve working automobiles in conditions of disrepair. In a film set in 1970 New York City, a 1967 car should be moderately rusted and a 1963 car should be heavily rusted. Instead all will look like they just came from a modern classic car show.

Does anyone have further examples?

A somewhat related situation occurs with the physical appearance of actors.  due to weight training, plastic surgery, and pharmaceutical enhancement, actors look nothing like people did more than 30 years ago.

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Run Mikey, Run!

Bloomberg running as a Democrat in 2020?

Good!

Perhaps, he’ll split any “moderate” vote and enable a radical like Kamala Harris to win the nomination.

Perhaps along the way, one way or another, he’ll highlight the divisions in his party. Will the Dems. hide the anti-Semitism that he’ll face or will that alienate Jews and moderates?

If he wins the nomination, he’ll energize our base, while likely not energizing the radical leftist base.

Are there any Trump 2016 states where Bloomberg might have a 2020 advantage that another Dem. would not?

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The wonders of competitive bidding

By contrast, the U.S. Air Force first estimated it would cost more than $19 billion to buy a package with 350 new advanced jet trainers and about 40 simulators. Instead, Boeing offered to deliver up to 475 T-X aircraft and 120 simulators for no more than $9.2 billion. That’s equivalent to an “eye-watering” $19 million unit price per aircraft, excluding the costs needed to pay for the engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) phase and 120 simulators, says James McAleese, founder of McAleese & Associates.

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SEC v. Elon Musk

The SEC has sued Elon Musk in the SDNY over the “funding secured” tweet. That’s in addition to class actions filed regarding that episode and the defamation suit over Musk’s “pedo guy” tweets. I still think the defamation plaintiff should have named SpaceX as a codefendant.

What do you think is the result?

What if the SEC uses all of Musk’s tweets to argue that his twitter demeanor and sloppiness render him unfit to be a CEO. This gives the media a bit of a dilemma. If they get onboard with the SEC, they can better argue Trump’s twitter behavior renders him unfit to be President.

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Analysis of a media smear of Trump

You can tell something is fishy when the media does not quote Trump on the key thing they then criticize him for.

Note:

No Mr. Trump, a Chevy Camaro Doesn’t Cost $119,000 in China

 

“When we make a car, we sell it into China and there’s a 25 percent tariff and that’s just the beginning,” he said in a speech in West Virginia, adding the Camaro costs three-times as much as it sells for in the U.S. “You understand that, right? It’s all taxes, taxes and taxes. We can’t do that anymore.”

Here’s the fact: Only one model of Camaro is sold in China, a coupe with a 2.0-liter turbo engine, according to a spokeswoman for General Motors Co., which makes the car. The vehicle sells for 399,900 yuan ($58,430) in the Asian country, according to the local website of the Detroit-based automaker. That compares with a starting price of $25,905 for a similar Camaro coupe model in the U.S.

They do not quote him on the $119k price. When they do not quote, they are hiding a lie.

Here’s the actual video:

Trump relayed a story from a guy who said that a driver of a $39-40k  Camaro in China told that guy it cost $119k.

This site says GM did not sell the V6 or V8 Camaro (which likely would have been in that $39-40k  range) in China because of progressive taxes on engine size (giving an example of a $33k Mustang GT going for $100k ). Sounds like Trump was exactly right on his numbers.

It’s likely the Camaro his guy saw was a grey market import where the importer paid the tariffs and taxes.

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FoxNews: Scavengers raiding WW2 shipwrecks because…

Vessels from World War II are particularly vulnerable to scrappers because they were built and sunk before nuclear explosions, so they have little “background radiation” from the atmosphere and are suitable for building medical equipment, experts told the news outlets.

The simple solution would be to nuke the areas where the ships now are.

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Talk about a “reality distortion field”!

Steve Jobs had nothing on Elon Musk.

The latest is Musk’s “Dugout Loop” between East Hollywood and Dodger Stadium:

While the cost of building the tunnel will take many years to recoup, sources familiar with the project say The Boring Company projects to be operationally profitable by charging a fee of $1 per person, per trip.

But let’s run the numbers. The article predicts a maximum of 2800 fans per Dodger game.  With 2 trips per game and 81 games, that’s 81 x 2800 x 2 trips per year or $453,600. That probably does not cover the electricity costs of keeping the tunnel pumped down to vacuum while also being pumped dry. It clearly does not cover other electricity costs, maintenance costs, depreciation…

As we are dealing with Dodger fans, you also probably will need to pay 20 police officers.

But, let’s imagine $10 per trip. That is very high given the fact it totals to $80 per game for a group of 4. At $4,536,000, you have probably covered utilities, but what kind of labor costs do you have?

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