A Warrior Class of Their Own

This is the title of a recent article I read in the Washington Examiner on the Green Berets, the U.S. Army’s most elite fighting force. Recently and rightfully so, the Navy SEALs have received quite a bit of attention particularly after the release of Clint Eastwood’s powerful film American Sniper.

This article further documented the continuous growth and innovation of our military and it made me proud, so I am anxious to share:

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/a-warrior-class-of-their-own

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What role, if any, does your morality play in your political choices?

This was a question posed by Susan Quinn of Ricochet and I thought it was a good one. If I was able to answer over there, this would be my response:

There are varying degrees of morality as our legal system certainly defines:
1. Murder: 1st degree, 2nd degree, premeditated and manslaughter
2. Rape: nonconsensual and statutory

Two examples: Clinton violated both examples of rape. DJT was a player. Not condoning the Don but I see no pathology here as I did with WJC.

Barack Obama was, in my honest opinion worse than immoral; he was amoral. He was resentful of the U.S. and highly influenced by his absentee father to hamper democracy, liberty and capitalism. And it is this that I consider the most unconscionable act of all.

Do not run for Leader of the Free World if you plot to undermine it. That’s what political monsters such as Hugo Chavez do.

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The Best and the Worst

Here’s a compilation of the five best and the five worst presidents in U.S. history. These lists were compiled from varying different sources from both MSM and historians and because they bore such striking similarities, I chose to use them as a starting point.

The best:
1. Lincoln
2. Washington
3. FDR
4. Teddy Roosevelt
5. Eisenhower

Personal commentary:
1. No to FDR whose New Deal laid the groundwork for the mess we’re in today and his reluctance to enter WWII earlier (despite the isolationist sentiment in the country) and his naivete about Stalin. Even his good ally Churchill claimed “what he lacked in intellect, he made up in character.” My response? You need both.
2.Teddy Roosevelt made the list mainly due to his personality and personal popularity and his dedication to environmentalism. NBD.

Shockingly missing?
1. Reagan (who came in 9th)
2. Calvin Coolidge

On to the worst:
1. John Tyler
2. Warren G. harding
3. Franklin Pierce
3. Andrew Johnson
5. James Buchanan

Personal commentary:
1. Not sure Pierce deserved #3 because in the 18 months before inauguration he lost all three sons and his wife to dementia.(Lincoln survived similar tragedies but this is one of the reasons he is consistently ranked #1.)
2. Obama is ranked as our 13th best and Clinton at #15. There is no reason to mention to this crowd why such rankings constitute a travesty of intellectual judgment.
3. BTW, where is Carter?

Perhaps both lists should have been expanded. Members, please contribute your lists and commentary especially, you MLR. This is your specialty!

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The Power and the Arrogance of the PC Movement

It’s official: politically correct behavior and outrage “against the man” has permeated even the pharmaceutical business.

I attempted to refill a minor anti-inflammatory prescription at a NY pharmacy where it is actually produced and thus less expensive.This was at the suggestion of my derm who called it in and I’ve had it shipped to Florida at considerable savings.

Yesterday I called in a refill and the acting pharmacist insisted my refill was for a different amount (50 v. 100 grams) and had been changed by my doctor here. Of course I knew this was nonsense because I’ve been going to the same derm for 20 years and she wouldn’t make such a random decision without consulting her patient.

One thing led to another over the phone; this pharmacist got heated and started cursing in Arabic. I responded: “I can’t understand a word you’re saying. You do know you’re dealing with American patients?”

Wowser! He went off on me with “I’m an American citizen same as you, blah, blah, blah” and then proceeded to tell me the drug was out of stock with no ETA and I should find another pharmacy. Hung up the phone.

I only repeat such a trivial story as an example of how the “trickle down theory” that Reagan espoused has truly changed course and become a warped weapon to use against native born Americans (and I’m not referring to Indian tribes.)

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God Save the Queen, Indeed

Prince Charles and Camilla make history in Cuba — BBC News

Say what? Quite unbelievable that Wales has no clue who pays for those $8,000 dollar Brioni suits and $400 dollar Zegna ties.

We have plenty of our own problems in this country, but I am shocked and appalled at the lack of discretion from our special friends. Obama I could understand because he hates America and all principles of democracy.

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The Decline and Fall of the WH Correspondent’s Dinner

The White House Correspondents’ dinner, enthusiastically called “nerd prom” for years by Washington journalists looking for champagne and selfies, is sobering up, with next week’s gala drawing few celebrities, no president, and now no press secretary.

As if to rub in the lost luster of the event, instead of the usual comedian, a historian will serve as the “entertainment.”

President Trump, snubbing the dinner a third time to host a rally, diverted top aides from the gala, while a faction within the White House Correspondents’ Association nixed the comedy routine, resulting in the least glitzy gathering in decades

Don’t you just love it??? I’m especially delighted that the Donald is doing a rally the same night that will be sure to dominate the ratings.

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Yeager: An Autobiography

I’m 100 pages into this book and I’d like to thank the member who recommended it. Tom Wolfe didn’t quite do General Yeager justice; he was and still is (I imagine) one wild coyote. This is the quote he chose for the back of the book:

“I don’t deny that I was damned good. If there is such a thing as ‘the best,’ I was at least one of the title contenders. I’ve had a full life and enjoyed just about every damned minute of it because that’s how I lived.”

I highly encourage all members to buy this book; it is raw, exciting and unbelievably impressive. His natural born talents- dexterity and an understanding of math and engineering from a very young age are fascinating. We’ve all seen the movie Top Gun but Yeager gives an authentic insight into the culture of fighter pilots.

What an American!

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Protecting Oneself

There has been so much written lately about both physical and sexual assault, I feel compelled to repeat a small story that may be helpful to others:

My mother was visiting in NYC and we were meeting friends in SoHo for dinner. I lived on the Upper West Side then and traffic was so congested I chose to take the subway. Mom was not happy but I told her it was the only way to get there at this point and I would take care of it.

We got on at the 72nd street stop knowing we’d get off downtown at Duane Street. Around the Times Sq stop, a bunch of rowdy gang-bangers entered our car and my mother froze. I told her to sit down and be quiet as I brazenly approached the rowdies who were already getting ready to make some trouble.

First question: “Dudes, help me here. My mom is freaking out on this loud form of transportation and I’d appreciate it if you could confirm that Duane St is the right stop for Cafe Odeon. Are we on the right train?”

Of course I knew I was on the right train, but unless you’re dealing with a true pathological, it’s always smart to play the “mom” card. It worked.

We got an escort off the train and to the restaurant. Moral of the story?

Don’t show fear.

Show respect and make people feel they are needed.

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McDonald’s, or, What You Can Learn from Work as a Teenager

By Clavius
March 23, 2019

I went to high school in Marquette, Michigan, a town of 22,000 in the Upper Peninsula. It is the largest city in the UP and is supported by a decent tourism industry in addition to mining and timber. The high school had about 1,200 students when I was there in the 1970s. Late in my sophomore year, a friend started working for the McDonald’s in town. I decided to apply and was given a minimum wage job.

I started work in the grill area, dressing burgers. The training was good, and I liked getting some money. I kind of just slid along, getting four-eight hours a week in two shifts on the weekend. Then an interesting thing happened. The general manager, not a particularly nice guy, asked me to clean the bathrooms. I went through the motions – mop, ice in the urinal, wipe things down, and came back to my post in the grill.

The GM came to me and asked me if I was done with the bathrooms. I said “yes,” and he replied “No, you’re not. Come with me.” We went to the men’s room and he showed me ketchup on the walls. And a spill behind the toilet. He made it clear that cleaning the bathrooms meant, you know cleaning them.

A light went off in my brain. It struck me what a job was. It was to understand the goal of an assignment and do it to the best of my ability. My whole attitude changed and so did my work habits. Soon I was getting full shifts on the weekends and some weeknight hours. I got a raise. One Saturday, I ran buns single-handedly on a $500 hour (that was a big hour in 1976). After a year, I was promoted to crew chief and got a cool yellow band around the base of my hat. The GM had given me a wonderful gift that has stayed with me my entire life.

The GM gave me another gift after I graduated. He called me into his office and asked me if I wanted to be an assistant manager. Fairly decent pay for a high school graduate. I told him that I had been admitted to UCLA and was planning to go to college. He said, “Absolutely, go to college, offer withdrawn.” He wasn’t such a bad guy after all.

I loved this post from the other site so much I chose to publish it here. I hope that’s okay and that the OP regards this as the compliment it was meant to be.

First of all, “Yoopers” are the hardest working salt of the earth type people on this planet and helped elect our president.

Second of all, I fully expected a completely different response from the author after being chastised about cleaning the bathroom. As a former business owner, I would have tried to clone him!

He reminded me very much of myself; I went to work (part-time) at age 15 busing tables, waitressing the 6:00 a.m. shift at the Hilton and the night shift at an Italian restaurant where I proceeded to spill an entire plate of spaghetti and meatballs on a customer’s lap. I was given another chance and was grateful because the tips were good.

Nothing else to say but that this was a feel-good post for me; hope y’all agree!

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Unexpected Gifts: The Gifts You Give

By Seawriter

Hope you don’t mind that I read this over there and posted it over here. It hit a nerve because I got the most exciting job of my life from a mere phone call from a former SVP with an enormous amount of clout. It changed my life and opened up many new vistas and I wasn’t even looking at the time!

In 2002, I was out of a job. My employer closed shop in September 2001, and immediately after 9-11 no one else was hiring. By the time businesses were again hiring, I had been unemployed six months.

In technology industries six months is forever. The longer I was out of work, less likely it was that I would get hired. I was rapidly becoming unemployable.

Then an acquaintance I casually knew 20 years earlier found out I needed a job. Call him Bill. Bill was a manager at NASA. While his organization did not need someone with my skills, many of his contractors did. He got my resume and pushed it to his contractors, even twisting an arm or two to get me interviews.

I soon found a job with a company that urgently needed my skills. I ended up working for a man I had worked for 15 years previously. He had been sorry to lose me then, and delighted to get me back. I would not have known about the opening without Bill’s help.

Afterward, I called Bill to thank him. I did not know why he had gone to all the effort he had for someone he barely knew. I was grateful. “I could not have gotten the job without your help,” I told him. “I owe you.”

“You do not owe me,” he said. “At best, we are even. If I can ever help you again, I will.”

He reminded me of something I had done 20 years earlier. He was a year or two out of college then. The company for which we were working was reducing its professional staff by three-quarters.

I was going to be one of the few junior people kept. Many of my coworkers, including Bill, were facing layoff. The economy was bad at that time. Losing your job right then – especially for those a year or so out of college – meant that you would leave that industry forever.

Since I was not looking for a job, I had time to help those that were. I could write well. I helped many of the junior people in my group – including Bill – prepare their resumes. I did not spend much time with each person, only a few hours.

Bill got a great job with the organization he is now with. After he was hired, he was told that they hired him because of his resume. At my urging he added a few lines I said would impress that employer. It did – and set him on the path to becoming a senior manager.

We think we have to do something really big to change someone else’s life. Instead it is often the small things that make the biggest changes – things so small you may not even notice them at the time. Those you affect remember, even when you do not.

Sometimes your most unexpected gifts come from the gifts you gave others, without thought of an exchange.
[added by Admin 10 Cents see comment #2]
This appeared in at E-gracenotes in a different form in 2006. I hold the copyright, and sadly e-gracenotes has disappeared into cyberspace.

I was able to ” pay forward” when a former assistant quit to take a job that I felt was beneath her talents and persuaded the company to give her a promotion. She then went on to become a SVP and travels the runway shows in Milan/Paris/London and is quite close with Donatella, the late Karl Lagerfeld from Dior, Alexander McQueen, etc. She is one cool chick!

I would add this as well: Never burn bridges!

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Steele is Stronger Than Iron

I was in heaven last night watching my favorite conservative author make an unusual appearance on my favorite journalist’s show. Shelby Steele was interviewed by Laura Ingraham. What a segment!

She asked him about the consistent accusations of racism in light of the progress made after the Civil Rights movement succeeded in attaining so many of its goals.

Professor Steele’s response knocked my socks off! He said and I have to quote loosely here:

“I grew up in the Jim Crow era and experienced the pain of segregation. Today I live a life that doesn’t remotely resemble that of my childhood. The problem now is that black Americans do not know how to handle freedom and opportunity and fall back on the comfort of victimization.”

Laura Ingraham was speechless as was I.

One further observation:

There are many fine scholars at the Hoover Institution (Thomas Sowell included) but Steele makes unusually original observations. It’s an oldie but a goodie so I recommend picking up his book White Guilt.

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Trading Tips

My husband and I are long term investors and 95% of our portfolio consists of dividend stocks. I do insist that we make a profit on the initial investment as well because dividends can mysteriously disappear if a company does not perform well on Dow Jones or NASDAQ.

However, I have set aside 5% to trade on a daily/weekly/monthly basis. The profits go into our “house account” meaning the money we have set aside to furnish our new home in NO Fla. The outer structure has obviously been paid for by the sale of our current home but as our new house is far more modern, we will unfortunately be unable to use a fair amount of our current furniture.

So….

I have been focusing on everybody’s favorite stock around here -Facebook- and just want to share some info that I know will infuriate many of you but I would feel remiss for keeping it to myself.

I’m having a ball with this stock because it is so predictably unpredictable. Y’all know I believe in the company and the founder but here’s a funny little secret – so does middle America. The U.S. govt is going after Zuckerberg as they did Gates and Sam Walton and I am using this to my advantage.

Everytime Mark Z is sued by the anti-capitalists in D.C. the stock plummets and I buy. Two days later the public moves on and the stock goes up by $2-3 bucks a share. I sell and move my profits over to my furniture account. I go back and forth as such and so far I have accumulated a new living room and outdoor kitchen.

I don’t recommend this if you don’t have the time to watch it every minute but as I mentioned, it represents a small percentage of my portfolio.

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I’m Voting for Donald Harris

As I’m arming up for 2020, couldn’t help sharing this tidbit from Fox with fellow members. My title is a bit disingenuous because we all know how I feel about The Donald but this father impressed me greatly.

KAMALA HARRIS, PUSHING LEGAL MARIJUANA, SAYS SHE SMOKED POT IN COLLEGE: ‘AND I INHALED’

The senator re-emphasized her use when asked by the hosts about rumors that she opposes marijuana legalization.

“That’s not true. Look, I joke about it, I have joked about it. Half my family is from Jamaica, are you kidding me?” Harris said, laughing.

Harris’ father, Donald, disapproved of the comments, which he told the Jamaica Global Online constituted “identity politics.”

“My dear departed grandmothers … as well as my deceased parents, must be turning in their grave right now to see their family’s name, reputation and proud Jamaican identity being connected, in any way, jokingly or not with the fraudulent stereotype of a pot-smoking joy seeker and in the pursuit of identity politics,” he said.

Donald Harris continued: “Speaking for myself and my immediate Jamaican family, we wish to categorically dissociate ourselves from this travesty.”

Amen!

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