Is there interest in a late night audio meetup?

We are spread over many different time zones. Finding a good time for everyone is not easy. I was thinking we could start another called LAMU, Late Audio Meetup, for those in later time zones.  An Audio Meetup is a conference call.

My preference would be a Wednesday or Thursday night call.


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Growing a Site

First there is no such thing as “a site” it is people. People are the secret sauce. Getting the write people is what is important. (Pun intended.) Things grow because there is something to read and discuss. People don’t want to come to see empty air but something productive and interesting.

Here is my list.

  1. An interface that doesn’t frustrate and get in the way. (Merci infiniment, M. Marcheur)
  2. A mood that encourages a friendly back and forth.
  3. Variety of posts. That there is something for everyone.
  4. Change. When you come back an hour later something has happened.
  5. “Wow! I didn’t know that.”
  6.  Emotions such as joy, anger, fear, sadness.
  7.  Being complementary. (This is not “complimentary”)
  8. Fabric softener.

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Knowledge Base: Uploading Video and Audio Files

Since inception, Ratburger.org has allowed you to embed video and audio hosted on a list of public sites such as YouTube and Vimeo simply by including the URL for the item on a line by itself.  See the Knowledge Base article “Embedding Media in Posts and Comments” for details.  But this isn’t much help when you wish to include a video or audio clip of your own, for example the latest screwball antics of your pet iguana or the latest track by your kazoo and sitar band.  Sure, you could create an account on one of the public video or audio hosting sites, upload your content, and then include the URL, but that’s a lot of fussy work and you may not want to make the item available to the general public.

In addition to images, Ratburger’s Media Library allows you to upload video and audio in a variety of formats and include them in posts and comments (but not in groups, which are basically text-only discussion boards).  You include these items much as you do images.  Use the “Add Media” button, select the video or audio file you wish to upload, wait for it to upload, and then click “Insert into post” to include a player for the clip in the post or comment you’re composing.

The type of the media file is determined by the extension or “file type” of the file you upload.  Video files may have the following extensions which identify their formats (most people can ignore the technical details in parentheses).

  • .webm (WebM, vp8.0/Vorbis)
  • .ogv (Ogg, Theora/Vorbis)
  • .mp4 (MPEG-4, H.264/AAC)

Audio files are identified by the following extensions.

  • .mp3 (MP3)
  • .ogg (Ogg, Vorbis)
  • .wav (WAV, PCM)

Unfortunately, due to patents, proprietary squabbles among manufacturers, and other speed bumps and potholes on the Information Rutted Road, there is no single format which is guaranteed to work everywhere.  “Power users” can upload multiple formats and make them available in a custom video or audio shortcode entered in the Text composition tab or by editing the media player item in the composition window, but this is beyond the scope of this document.

Uploads are limited to 32 megabytes.  This is usually not a problem for audio, but video clips should be short and small.  This is a not a video hosting site: we have neither the file storage space nor Internet bandwidth for lengthy, high-resolution videos.  To post them, you’re going to have to use one of the public hosting sites.

For example, the following is a two minute video I recorded in July 2009 at a concert of our village brass band.  This was compressed into 360 pixel Ogg video format yielding a file of 6.9 Mb.

This is a an audio clip of the finale from the 1999 movie South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut, which figured in my 2006 project CSI: South Park.  This is a 545 Kb MP3 file.

___________________________


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“Fairness” Doctrine for Social Media?

Private companies’ content censorship raises important public concerns of a magnitude meriting book-length treatment. Not here, however, and not by me. The left, for example, saw its near-absolute content control of most public media – print, broadcast, movies, education – as insufficient because of talk radio. Leftist radio programs fell flat while Rush Limbaugh, intolerably, soared to prominence. We know that tolerance has a very restricted meaning for leftists, thus their regulatory effort to quash conservative talk radio with the “fairness doctrine” was a case study in the use of state power in furtherance of their illiberal – totalitarian, actually – impulses and tactics.

The left never hesitates to enforce its rubrics, on pain of abusive name-calling (amplified by their “media”) or ruination at the hands of some public agency or other with enforcement powers. For instance, a Christian baker in Colorado is being singled out yet again.  All sense of proportion has been lost, to such an extent that definitions of basic language and process must be re-examined. Does what we have referred to as media up until now still qualify as media?

Are newspapers and TV newscasts merely  neutral means of communication for all or do they now zealously advocate one single worldview, to the vituperous exclusion of all others? It is no longer merely a medium when the New York Times “news” pages are blatantly editorial and read like daily DNC talking points. Do administrative agencies, whose rules are enacted at every level – federal, state and local – by leftist activists (who are the pervasive and permanent denizens of these administrative swamps) really represent the will of the voting majority? There are literally scores of thousands of such rules – many with huge fines or even prison sentences for non-compliance – at every level of government, so that virtually anyone could be ruined by merely coming to the attention of a “public servant” with an axe to grind – particularly vis-à-vis an uppity, outspoken conservative. Legislative or judicial oversight of such agencies, as a practical matter, is non-existent.

While it would be a terrible idea to attempt to impose a “fairness doctrine” on Silicon Valley, I am heartened that President Trump tweeted today on the subject of censorship of conservative viewpoints by social media and said “…we won’t let that happen”.  As a proponent of small government, I do not advocate promiscuous use of state power to right all wrongs. However, the situation today is intolerable. With the status quo – where we cannot even be heard to object – we can only lose our rights. The power of the state is being used regularly to stifle non-progressive speech and this is being perpetrated in part by state-sanctioned companies with monopoly power. Trump’s statements are useful push-back and very necessary, as the progre$$ive $ilicon Valley types have had a free ride up until now, doing as they like to squash our views.

While I am not thrilled with use of state power generally, one of its necessary powers is to “secure” our fundamental rights – like freedom of political speech. Maybe we ought to recall Obama’s rejoinder that, “You didn’t build that…” These huge companies, to some extent after all, exist at the sufferance of the entire public and the state functionaries which represent us. It is unacceptable for companies with monopoly power to censor speech with which they disagree and to do it by subterfuges such as “offensive” or contrivances like “hate speech”.  Although they are private companies and do have substantial commercial rights, such rights are not without limit and may not legitimately be used to infringe fundamental personal (and essentially political) freedom of speech rights of millions of individuals. To say otherwise is to make the Constitution into a suicide pact for conservatives and libertarians..

It is high time these behemoths began to fear negative consequences for some of their business practices, including censorship. If he chooses, President Trump can make their lives difficult and their bottom lines shrink by executive actions (and not necessarily executive orders). It is time, I think, to set the Department of Justice about the task of examining antitrust aspects of the business practices of Google (YouTube), Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, Apple, etc. The exercise will likely prove salutary.


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Knowledge Base: Excerpts

When you write a post and publish it, by default only the first two paragraphs will appear on the Ratburger home page.  To read the balance of the post, a reader needs to click “[Read More]”, which will display the complete post and its comments.

This is done to allow visitors to the site to skim through the titles and start of posts and decide which they want to read in their entirety.

The definition of “paragraph” is, as with most things in WordPress, a brutal hack based on looking at the text and guessing what constitutes a paragraph.  The way the code is implemented, a heading at the start of the post or a photo is considered a paragraph.  This means, for example, that if you start your post with a heading and a photo, visitors to the home page won’t see any of the text of the body of your post without clicking “[Read More]”.

You can avoid this infelicity by placing an explicit excerpt mark in your post.  This indicates the portion of the post which should be shown on the home page and which subsequent material should only appear if the user clicks on “[Read More]” or the post’s title to read the whole thing.

Post composition toolbar with excerpt marker highlighted

To place an excerpt mark, click on the line which marks the break and click the “Insert Read More” icon (which looks like a two lane road).  It will put a break in your post where the material above will be shown on the home page and that below only to those who “read the whole thing”.

For example, in my Monday Meals post for 2018-08-13, I have a heading, image, and first paragraph which I want to appear on the home page, so I inserted a “Read More” break after the first text paragraph.  If I hadn’t done this, the automatic excerpt generator would have shown only the heading and photo, which would have been less than ideal.

WordPress “shortcode” features which are used for such things as spoiler warnings and including mathematics in posts do not work in home page excerpts.  If your post contains such things, you can use explicit “Read More” breaks to ensure those who visit the home page will not see them.  When a user clicks through to the full post, they will be displayed correctly.


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Programming Question

How easy would it be to exclude one category from the regular view?

I am trying to be proactive. There is usually a topic that gets a million posts. People get tired of seeing those. Of course, people could just skip over them but they don’t. If there was a button to filter these out, I think people would like that. It seems at most there is only one or two of these issues. The power is given to the user to filter so it is a bottom up decision.

I am asking this publicly to find out if people are for it and in keeping with our openness policy.

What is Ratburger?

“What is Ratburger?” is a good question but it was not high on the priority list when we started. The big thing was just to see if something would work. John got the site up on his test domain. And it just so happened his test domain name was Ratburger.org. My first thought was “RATBURGER.ORG?!!!!” (I often think in capital letters with four exclamation points.) Then I realized the name was in line or is it online with my thinking. I wanted something memorable and down to earth. Something with a smirk and fun in it. Well, it does that, doesn’t it?

I have talked to John on a conference call weekly for a few years. (It is rumored he used to have a full head of hair before he started talking to me.) I got to know him so I knew a site done with him would be technically good and be interesting. He has always been open to the ideas of others and even has some ideas of his own.

I think of John like this.

The old joke:

Boss: Jump!

Employee: How high?

The John Variant:

Me suggesting: We need to go higher.

John: I have built an elevator. What floor? BTW, I think making an express elevator is not needed at this time but if we do need one the perpetual motion model is economical.

What is Ratburger.org? It is just a site trying to get off the ground. It is a site that doesn’t want to take itself too seriously but does want to allow serious discussions without all the crap. Hopefully, it is a site you will want to come to not to get angry but to smile.

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Changing the Paradigm: Ref

Most of us came from a place with Moderators. I don’t like the term. I don’t like it for three reasons.

  1. It sounds pretentious.
  2. It gives the wrong impression.
  3. Most people have never dealt with a Moerator before.

I propose Ref as in referee as the correct term. For at least these three reasons.

  1. It sounds more down to earth.
  2. It explains the job better.
  3. Most of us have had experiences with refs.

I know this might sound like semantics but it is important. A Moderator will call a game it seems at a drop of a hat. A Ref would never do that. A Moderator will give a speech where a Ref makes the call and leaves the field. A Moderator tries to influence the debate. If a Ref does they need to be fired.

Fouls and penalties are part of the game. There is no need to be particularly ashamed of them. A Ref doesn’t humiliate players. They don’t add snark to the call. They respect the players for they love the game.

Booing the Ref is also part of the game. Whether it is fair or not close calls are seen differently. No one penalizes a captain of the team for voicing objections to the call.  Refs do the best they can and make mistakes. It is an art more than a science and the Ref is appreciated for upholding rules impartially. Everyone expects lousy calls but want to see them on both sides.

A Ref does things in the open. They don’t have a private conference with the player. The judgment is made from public knowledge. The spectators, the players, and offender see the reason for the call. Players don’t get penalized for things said in locker rooms. No hidden disappearances.

A Ref is not a star. No one remembers even the names of most refs, right?They do their jobs without chips on their shoulders. They keep the ball in play and don’t pick fights with players. They can throw a player out of a game but they don’t have the power to suspend or ban. That is made higher up.

What I like about a Ref is everyone can agree “I was robbed.” and not lose sleep over it. And a Ref doesn’t call you on your cell phone after the game to reprimand you.

What do you think?

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Hey, it’s free.

“Hey, it’s free.” has been at the top of Ratburger.org from the beginning. This site’s desire is to have free and open discussions with as little as possible restrictions. It is family friendly not to restrict speech but to have the discussion be able to reach the most people possible. It also sets us apart to the “excrement excrement copulate copulate genitalia” sites.

Oh, by the way we don’t charge. We don’t track. We don’t clutter your screen with advertisements.

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General Thoughts on Comments and Posts

Ratburger.org is a place to exchange ideas and debate issues. Since we are not all the same, our views differ. You get to disagree with others and they get to disagree with you. In that disagreement negative words are often used. Why? Because people think their ideas are better therefore your ideas are bad. Mild negative words will often be used such as strange, crazy, illogical, fallacious, etc. This is normal. Take this in stride.

The general idea is not to be unkind to others but to clearly state different views. After that, it is expected for people to defend their views. Back up views with reasons, facts, and life experiences. Listen to others as they state their reasons. Let them try to find faults with your reasons as you try to find faults with your reasons.

Just because someone does not see it your way they are not bad or lacking in knowledge. More often than not they have a different perspective and might even be right.

As much as possible try not to offend people and try not to take offense too easily. (This is for me as much as anyone.)

Enjoy the site!!!


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Knowledge Base: Following Posts

When you publish an article on Ratburger.org (on the main page, not in a group), you will automatically be set to “follow” that post.  This means that when people like your article or comment on it, you’ll receive notifications which, when clicked, will take you to the post or comment.

When you comment on a post, you will also automatically be subscribed to notifications when people like your comment or make additional comments on the post.

Once you have been subscribed to notifications on a post by either of these mechanisms there is, at present, no means to unsubscribe.  However, most Ratburger posts scroll off the attention span of members within around a day, so it’s unlikely your notifications will be cluttered with likes and comments on posts  dating back to the Silurian period.

A new feature allows you to follow activity on a post without making a comment visible to other members.  If you wish to be notified of new comments on a post but don’t have anything to say at the moment, simply post a comment consisting entirely of the text:

follow
or c4c

(The latter, adopted from other sites, is an abbreviation of “comment for comment”.)  Upper and lower case is ignored, as is leading white space and trailing white space and sentence ending characters.

Such a comment will cause you to follow the post and receive notifications for subsequent comments, but will not appear in the comments when others view the post, nor in the “Recent Comments” in the sidebar.  When you view the post yourself, you’ll see your own follow comment; this allows you to delete it should you wish to cease following the post.  Other users will not see your follow post.  Note that if you’ve followed a post this way and made a subsequent comment, deleting the follow post will not unfollow you, as the latter comment will still mark you as a follower of the post.


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6 Months in

Here are the stats from 4 months in.

636 Posts

7,312 Comments

87 Users

20,564 Likes (Posts — 3850, Comments–15,059, Groups for the rest)

Here is where we are now.

1014 Posts

13,139 Comments

110 Users

41,394 Likes (Posts — 6812, Comments–31,876, Groups for the rest)

149 is the current build number. (Thank you John Walker.)

Except for new users we have almost doubled posts, comments, and likes. The more we engage in the site the more other people will want to engage. When a new person or an old member writes their first post that encourages others to write.

Please sign up for the Thought of the Day. This helps in two ways. It evens out the posting. If everyone just posts on the same day, posts get lost in that days posts. Two, it sets a deadline for your post. Without a deadline, people always put off posting. Remeber, these can be light hearted posts, quotes, a picture, a joke, a trivia question, or something more serious. Like I wrote before, when you engage in the site more people will want to engage.

We have a marketing budget of $0. We spent everything on Ratburger One. 😉 We depend on word of month marketing. That means us. If you know of someone who would like to join let that person know. Send a link to something that is written and ask them what they think. As I have stated before the first rule (only rule) is to have fun. This is a place to be enjoyed not to be endured. If we aren’t having fun, we have failed.

“Hey, it’s free.”

Thanks.

(For those who are new, here are our principles.)

PRINCIPLES OF AGREEMENT

  1. This site is for entertainment. Posts need to add not subtract from the site. Fun is important.
  2. No attacking the person. Attacking words are okay. People get to openly disagree and have vigorous debates over ideas not personalities.
  3. Keep it clean. This site should be family and children friendly. (The web has plenty of places to express non-family thoughts.) This does not mean that we don’t handle in John Walker’s words “gnarly subjects” but we do it without the coarseness of most of the Internet.
  4. Keep it legit. Respect copyright toward images and text. Give attribution when needed.
  5. This is a conservative site. If you can’t respect those principles please find a site more conducive to your ideas.
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Government-inspired Dehumanization

I am incensed and may be hard put to find the right words to describe the precipitating event. A friend and colleague phoned me yesterday to tell me he was suicidally depressed and had admitted himself to a psych hospital. He asked me to come and visit him. I told him I would come in the early evening. For me, such a promise become an irrevocable duty, especially when my friend is likely already feeling lonely and abandoned as he is recently divorced (acrimoniously).

I arrived at the lobby of the hospital to find 3 armed guards milling about, inside a security area which looked just like the ones at an airport. A young woman in front of me eventually had a conversation with one of them, which I could not hear. She handed over all her personal belongings, including her phone, at a window and went in. I then told the guard the name of the person I was there to visit. He asked for the unit number. I did not know it. He said, then, I can’t come in and suggested I call a family member of my friend. I told him that to my knowledge, none lived nearby and I have no contact with them. He said I should call my friend. Of course, his cell phone had been confiscated and the one patient phone on the unit in which he is imprisoned is constantly busy!

I then asked that he contact the administrator on call. He refused. I told him my friend was admitted suicidal and asked me to please come visit him. He said “I don’t blame you for being upset.” I could barely contain myself and only said, I used to work at this institution as a physician and he could be sure I would be raising hell over this event. When such a condition arises in a hospital, the usual thing is to call the administrator on call. In reality, they exist to prevent lawsuits. I went outside.

The reason for armed guards and turning a hospital into a prison is the fact that, about 5 years ago, an insane and/or evil individual shot and killed several people in the lobby. This completely inhumane situation represents the typical US institutional response to unrealistic demands for perfect safety, coupled with the absurd demands of HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act).

This law, typical of federal law nowadays, burdens or prevents most all normal, caring human behavior as to sick people and makes it difficult to transfer medical information when patients actually wish to do so. All the while, while purporting to protect privacy, the federal government simply exempts itself from the law’s strictures whenever it likes. In effect, no one’s confidential medical information is protected from government snooping. Of all the institutions which might use my confidential medical information to harm me, none has the overarching power of the state – from which I have little or no protection!

I found myself outside the hospital, furious and worried that my friend would be desperate when I didn’t show up as promised. I used my phone to look up a health system help line. After the requisite hold, someone answered and said – naturally – her office could not help with that. I brought the governor to bear on my anger and told her I am a physician, retired from the medical center which runs the psych hospital, that my suicidal friend was also a physician retired from there, and that he asked me to please visit him. She eventually connected me to a clerk (not a guard) sitting at the desk in the same lobby I had just left. She said she would call the unit and ask the patient to call me with the unit number. I extracted a promise she would do so immediately.

After waiting 15 minutes, I called my friend’s therapist, who also treats me (and who had recommended that my friend call me). He is the one who gave me the phone number on the patient unit, enabling me to reach my friend earlier and promise to visit. I needed that phone number because when my friend called my cell phone earlier that day to tell me of his admission, the call went to voicemail; since I get so many robo-calls, I only answer those I know. My friend had not left me a call back number.

The therapist answered, said he was at a meeting, but took the call when I immediately vomited the problem on him. In the middle of that call, call waiting went off. My friend was calling and gave me the unit number (Today I sent an email apology to the therapist for having interrupted him and for having rung off abruptly). I then left my phone and other belongings in my car (so I didn’t have to hand them over)(they took my keys as well), and went in through numerous locked doors to a hospital unit whose decor was inspired by the tower of London.

The visit to my friend went well and did us both some good. It turned out that the young woman who had been allowed in at the beginning of the ordeal was my friend’s daughter, whom I didn’t recognize as I had not seen her in 15 years. Long story shortened, with my wife’s assent, I invited him to come stay with us for some time after he is discharged. He has had a hellish past few years with two major residence moves, two job losses, a nasty divorce (including a huge financial hit), and the serious mental illness of one of his other daughters.

I love this man as a brother. I have always had an affinity for him. In recounting this in our conversation last evening, I said my affinity likely comes from the fact that I see much of myself in the mirror of my friend. As one who also lives with dysthymia, depression and anhedonia, there, but for the grace of God… I don’t really know why it is, but, so far at least, even at my darkest, I don’t think about self-harm. For whatever reason, I have a very strong survival instinct and want to stay alive – even if I am suffering, I somehow continue to put one foot in from of the other – to witness as much of the future unfold as I can.

Although I cannot affect the future, I feel an intense stake in how it turns out for humanity. Notwithstanding my delusional earlier beliefs that “progress” had exempted us from possible extinction, even at the existential level, much is in doubt. If our existence as a species continues, what it means to be human – given advances in genetics and computer engineering – may well change dramatically and possibly not for the better.

To fend off the darkness, I also try to be useful to others as I am able. I do it regularly in my work as an anesthesiologist. That is what keeps me going and why I can’t retire. I explained to my friend that if he stays with us, it would not be a burden; it would be a privilege. His allowing us to be of service by staying with us, my wife and I will experience as a gift received. It will allow us to feel good about ourselves by doing an act which is neither complicated, stressful or difficult – quite unlike the effort it took to merely visit him while he is so well “protected” by the state and the institution of “caring” in which he finds himself.

This execrable episode is emblematic of what is wrong with bureaucratic, technocratic and metastatic government and highlights the fascistic relationships which devolve with large non-governmental institutions. The combination disempowers individuals from moral action and even simple kindness. It infantilizes them, makes them wholly dependent; coerces them to submit to minute, unknowable, often-absurd rules. In short, it dehumanizes us all, thereby setting the stage for any of the horrors which have recurred throughout recorded history, as to which most assuredly believe, “it can’t happen here.”

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Experimental Feature: Visual Editing of Comments

I have just enabled local modifications to permit visual (“rich text”) editing of comments on posts.  Since 2018-02-15 users have been able to edit their own comments on posts.  However, editing was always with the “Quicktags” editor, in which the user edits the HTML code of the comment, not the visual presentation used by default when composing a comment (using the “TinyMCE” editor).

The change makes the TinyMCE visual editor available, and the default, when editing comments.  The Quicktags editor remains available for those who prefer it, or when editing the comment at the HTML level is the only way to accomplish what you’re trying to do (for example, custom styles, fonts, colours, etc.).  The “Add Media” button is available when in Visual mode, making it easy to add new images while editing comments.  Shortcodes, such as those for spoilers, mathematics, and drop capitals, may be used in either Visual or Text mode editing.

This is actually, in terms of lines of code, a relatively minor change, but developing it required extensive research into how WordPress handles editing comments, culminating in a marathon session described in the Updates group post for 2018-05-03.  But given the towering and tottering stack of hacks which is WordPress, the consequences of even the smallest change can be profound, so since putting the new code into production today, 2018-05-04 at 19:30 UTC, I have been watching the HTTP error_log closely for any errors.  If you notice any strange behaviour when editing comments in either Visual or Text mode, please report them in comments to this post or in the Bug Reports group.

If you want to experiment with the new comment editing code or try to break it with torture tests, please use the Sand Box post, which exists for that purpose.

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