This Week’s Book Review – The Dead of Jerusalem Ridge

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.... [Read More]

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One Last Book

About one hundred & twenty years ago, British society was transfixed by reports from the Younghusband Mission – an invasion from British-ruled India into the mysterious land of Tibet.  Playing the Great Game, Britain’s rulers were concerned that an expansionist Russia would push into Tibet and threaten Britain’s Indian empire.  The aim was to get a treaty with Tibet which would keep the Russians out – but the Tibetans did not want to open negotiations.  Consequently, in December 1903, a British army of about 3,000 men with a multitude of pack animals and camp followers crossed the border from India into Tibet.

December?  Wintertime?  Crossing the Himalayas where the passes could be up to 16,600 feet (5,000 meters) high?  Author Charles Allen carefully reconstructed the events of the Younghusband Mission from contemporary reports and diaries & letters of the participants, laying out the story in “Duel in the Snows”, ISBN 0-7195-54276 (2004).... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – 1637: No Peace Beyond the Line

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.... [Read More]

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Technological Breakthroughs

In the “Suckers-R-Us” thread, we wandered off into a discussion about technology.  John Walker posed a thought-provoking question:  “But what’s the last significant technological breakthrough you saw coming from the U.S.?”

Scratching my head about this, I came up with 3 examples:... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – Churchill’s Shadow Raiders

If no one objects, I will continue posting my book reviews on Ratburger until John shuts down the site. They will continue to be cross-posted on Ricochet.com... [Read More]

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Before We Go – Amazon Book-Banning

When I learned that Evil Amazon had banned a book, I of course had to buy a copy to find out from what Amazon was protecting our fragile minds.  I paid an unsuccessful visit to AbeBooks – forgetting that in this highly competitive world Abebooks is owned by … Amazon.  Now my dander was up!  OK, it is possible to buy the book directly from: https://www.texemarrs.com/

The book in question is by James Perloff, “Covid-19 and the Agendas to Come”, ISBN 978-0-9668160-4-4, published by Refuge Books.  So what is the fuss about?  What does Evil Amazon not want us simple-minded easily-confused people to see?... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – Mutiny on the Spanish Main

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – America’s New Destiny in Space

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.... [Read More]

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Life is a Bitch – Math Edition

Inspired by Prof. Petr Beckmann’s classic 1970 book “A History of Pi”, Eli Maor in 1994 wrote “e:  The Story of a Number”.  ISBN 0-691-03390-0.  Maor’s view is that the teaching of mathematics suffers from a lack of context.  Including the historical background and the characters whose struggles led to advances would, he thinks, make mathematics more interesting and accessible to students and the general population.  He certainly makes that case in this book which spans the ages from Babylonians in 1700 BC to modern times, digging into the mysterious number 2.7182818284… which keeps on cropping up in everything from interest rates to nuclear explosions.  Math will always be math, causing fear & loathing in the kind of non-numerate person who ends up devising national budgets in Western democracies, but putting a human face on it may make it more intriguing.

One of the many fascinating elements in this book is the story from the 1600s of Sir Isaac Newton (upon whose head the apple fell) and Baron Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz.  Back in high school math class, most of us were told that these two gentlemen independently invented calculus;  there was some debate at the time about who should get the credit, but nowadays no-one really cares.  Then it was on to memorizing formulae.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – Snowblind

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.... [Read More]

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Science Fictions

Science Fictions:  Exposing Fraud, Bias, Negligence and Hype in Science” by Stuart Ritchie (2020)                    ISBN 978 184 792 5657

With a title like that, the reader may think he is in for a treat – a hard-hitting factual investigation into the death-dealing campaign against DDT;  the expensive misinformation about the Ozone Hole;  the real story about the AIDS “epidemic” which did not cause us to lose an entire generation;  the resources wasted on Anthropogenic Global Warming;  the Covid Scam.  Lord knows!  Since Science decided to whore for Public Policy dollars, there have been lots of “fictions” to target.  However, that reader would be disappointed – informed by the book, but nevertheless disappointed.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – If You Can Get It

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.

Book Review

Two Sisters Finally Get Adulting

“If You Can Get It,” by Brendan Hodge, Ignatius Press, 2020, 285 pages, $16.95 (trade paperback), $9.99 (Kindle)

Jen Nilsson has it all, a great condo in California, a fast-track job in a Silicon Valley start-up, and a seemingly limitless future. Life is good and bound to get better. Then her sister Katie, ten years younger, and just out of college, calls and asks if she can move in with her big sister.  Katie can no longer stand living with their parents.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – Ten Global Trends Every Smart Person Should Know

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – Agent Sonya: Moscow’s Most Daring Wartime Spy

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – The Last Brahmin

Looking for a good read? Here is a recommendation. I have an unusual approach to reviewing books. I review books I feel merit a review. Each review is an opportunity to recommend a book. If I do not think a book is worth reading, I find another book to review. You do not have to agree with everything every author has written (I do not), but the fiction I review is entertaining (and often thought-provoking) and the non-fiction contain ideas worth reading.

Book Review

The Man Who Transformed the Midcentury Republican Party

“The Last Brahmin: Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and the Making of the Cold War,” by Luke A. Nichter, Yale University Press, 2020, 544 pages, $37.50 (Hardcover)

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. was the grandson of Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr. His namesake was a confidant of President Theodore Roosevelt, and the bête noire of Roosevelt successor Woodrow Wilson. His grandson became at least as prominent a Republican politician during the mid-twentieth century.... [Read More]

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