Where have all the viewers gone?

I read this over at Breitbart.

Primetime Viewership Compared to Same Week Last Year

Fox News: -4 percent

MSNBC: -4 percent

CNNLOL: -33 percent

Total Day Viewership Compared to Same Week Last Year

Fox News: -7 percent

MSNBC: -5 percent

CNNLOL: -21 percent

It looks like CNN is Tapped out. The Cuomo News Network may need to remember not all the bad news is about Trump. It can be closer to home. I haven’t been watching but is Rachel still smirking. I know I am. Are you? (This is unkind but turnabout is fair play.)

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Avenatti Avenatti Avenatti

I think liberals and pearl clutchers need to be reminded how much they trusted Michael Avenatti. They trusted a guy who was despicable because he was pushing their narrative. I think someone needs to go “Avenatti, Avenatti, Avenatti” a few times to them. They need to be reminded that they were/are a poor judge of character as they pontificated their indignation.

The linked video is of an interview with Alan Dershowitz. He was a mainstay on CNN for the longest time till he started to give the “wrong” legal opinion. I hope he never lets CNN forget their Avenatti Crush.

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2019/04/21/dershowitz_media_gets_f_grade_on_mueller_coverage_cnn_chose_to_trust_avenatti_over_me.html?jwsource=cl

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Netflix Recommendation: “Shtisel”

“Shtisel” is a brilliant Israeli series that follows a family from a conservative Jewish community in Jerusalem. There are no fireworks–just the drama of ordinary lives–but it works well. It’s real, and even disturbing at times, without sinking into fatalism. The characters develop, so I’m glad I stuck it out after the first couple of episodes. It uses flashback and surreal dream scenes, and it took some getting used to. In detail after detail, for twelve episodes in each of the two seasons, individuals’ gifts, flaws, and motivations are revealed. Some scenes will give you an “aha” moment about the family, as you connect the incidents with narrative from previous episodes.
 
The main character, Akiva, is the youngest son of the Shtisel family, living with his father and seeking a match after his mother has died. He is kind of a dull fellow, who doesn’t seem to have a backbone or many interests besides drawing. His several siblings are already grown and married, some likable and interesting, others not. Akiva and his father teach at the local boys’ school, and the family adhere to Orthodox Jewish practices such as uttering a prayer before eating and kissing their fingers as they go through a doorway. Although Akiva’s mother has died, her presence and influence is still felt in the household. None of this sounds like a formula for a fascinating series, but the journey was so rewarding that I watched its two seasons and look forward to a third.
The show made me curious about a couple of points. First, I was surprised how basic the standard of living was for this community. The houses are just ugly inside, with little adornment and plain, cheap materials. The food doesn’t look appealing, either. Good jobs seem like a scarce commodity. Then I realized that it must have been the way of life for that community; when characters finally travel outside of that, you see a metropolis that looks a bit like San Diego. Second, I thought Hebrew was spoken in Israel, but it sounds a lot like German, definitely with German words. Someone suggested that it could be Yiddish, but then I saw a dialogue where a character offers to speak in Yiddish so the children wouldn’t overhear what he was about to say. Maybe they are switching among three languages. English words and phrases are inserted occasionally, but English doesn’t seem to influence their discourse much other than that.
 
With its rich detail, the series effectively immersed me in this community, showing–beyond the portrayals of clothing, customs, and daily rituals– the humanity of the residents and their challenge in living as Orthodox Jews in today’s world.
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“The Orville”: Interview with Seth MacFarlane and the Creative Team

The Orville (television series)The Orville”, while not in the “Star Trek” canon, has done much to restore the episodic tradition of the Original Series of Star Trek and its successor, The Next Generation.  What I mean by episodic is that for the most part each episode stands alone and is a self-contained story.  While there may be some two-parters, you don’t have the half-season or longer “story arcs” which have become common in the more indulgent era of cable and binge-watching on streaming services.

“The Orville” doesn’t take itself too seriously, but it is no sense a parody.  There are episodes which explore serious themes such as up-voting and down-voting on social networks.

On 2017-11-16, Seth MacFarlane, creator of the show, star, executive producer, and writer of some of the episodes, and his creative team visited Google for a presentation and question and answer session about the show.  It’s well worth watching, even though there are a few naughty words which wouldn’t make it past the network censors but were apparently fine with the Cultural Marxist commissars at Google.

Note how almost every Google attendee who asked a question began it with “So?”  This is how they show their submission to the collective.

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And now for something completely different . . .

Except maybe to the sock.

Japanese commercials from 2018.

I guess synchronized dancing is a thing in Japan. Does this really sell soap (or whatever) there?

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Tribbles

In the 1967 Star Trek episode “The Trouble with Tribbles” Dr McCoy discovers “Well, the nearest thing I can figure out is that they’re born pregnant—which seems to be quite a time-saver.”

I always thought this was one of the funniest lines in the episode.  It couldn’t really happen, though, could it?

Adactylidium mite

This is a mite of the genus Adactylidium.  It’s a lot smaller, and less furry and lovable than a tribble, but it’s essentially born pregnant.  The mite is a parasite which feeds on the eggs of tiny insects called thrips.  The female eats the egg and develops five to eight female offspring and one male in her body.  The male impregnates the unborn females, who then eat their way out of the mother’s body.  They then seek new eggs upon which to feed.  The male neither feeds nor seeks new mates and dies after a few hours.  The females who are successful in finding a thrips egg live for about four days, when they are eaten alive by their own offspring.

Which seems to be quite a time-saver.

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