This Week’s Book Review – Bartolomé de las Casas: Chronicle of a Dream

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.

Book Review

Novel recounts de las Casas’ life as civil rights advocate

By MARK LARDAS... [Read More]

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Global Strategic Change in Sound Bite Form

The best part of the UK Election result is it is the last linchpin for a new economics of the planet. The post Nixon era of globalists buying congress and the Federal Bureaucracy to keep the money , assets, skills , intellectual property and jobs flowing out of the US is crashing down. With the incentives for relocation of the supply chains out of China (both from tariffs by the USA and Chinese blatant piracy), the rejection of NAFTA and TPP, we are forming a group of the USA, Japan, Mexico, Canada, and now the UK , with potential for Australia and Brazil to join who will implement fair trade and real win win economics. Canada will eventually come along politically out of necessity. The UK -US deal will begin the complete destruction of the EU as an economic cartel.

The implications are staggering for the chance of keeping freedom alive for a few more generations.... [Read More]

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Book Review: I Will Bear Witness. Vol. 2

“I Will Bear Witness”, vol. 2. by Victor KlempererThis is the second volume in Victor Klemperer’s diaries of life as a Jew in Nazi Germany. Volume 1 covers the years from 1933 through 1941, in which the Nazis seized and consolidated their power, began to increasingly persecute the Jewish population, and rearm in preparation for their military conquests which began with the invasion of Poland in September 1939.

I described that book as “simultaneously tedious, depressing, and profoundly enlightening”. The author (a cousin of the conductor Otto Klemperer) was a respected professor of Romance languages and literature at the Technical University of Dresden when Hitler came to power in 1933. Although the son of a Reform rabbi, Klemperer had been baptised in a Christian church and considered himself a protestant Christian and entirely German. He volunteered for the German army in World War I and served at the front in the artillery and later, after recovering from a serious illness, in the army book censorship office on the Eastern front. As a fully assimilated German, he opposed all appeals to racial identity politics, Zionist as well as Nazi.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – From Kites to Cold War

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.... [Read More]

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Book Review: Atomic Energy for Military Purposes

“Atomic Energy for Military Purposes” by Henry D.. SmythThis document was released to the general public by the United States War Department on August 12th, 1945, just days after nuclear weapons had been dropped on Japan (Hiroshima on August 6th and Nagasaki on August 9th). The author, Prof. Henry D. Smyth of Princeton University, had worked on the Manhattan Project since early 1941, was involved in a variety of theoretical and practical aspects of the effort, and possessed security clearances which gave him access to all of the laboratories and production facilities involved in the project. In May, 1944, Smyth, who had suggested such a publication, was given the go ahead by the Manhattan Project’s Military Policy Committee to prepare an unclassified summary of the bomb project. This would have a dual purpose: to disclose to citizens and taxpayers what had been done on their behalf, and to provide scientists and engineers involved in the project a guide to what they could discuss openly in the postwar period: if it was in the “Smyth Report” (as it came to be called), it was public information, otherwise mum’s the word.

The report is a both an introduction to the physics underlying nuclear fission and its use in both steady-state reactors and explosives, production of fissile material (both separation of reactive Uranium-235 from the much more abundant Uranium-238 and production of Plutonium-239 in nuclear reactors), and the administrative history and structure of the project. Viewed as a historical document, the report is as interesting in what it left out as what was disclosed. Essentially none of the key details discovered and developed by the Manhattan Project which might be of use to aspiring bomb makers appear here. The key pieces of information which were not known to interested physicists in 1940 before the curtain of secrecy descended upon anything related to nuclear fission were inherently disclosed by the very fact that a fission bomb had been built, detonated, and produced a very large explosive yield.... [Read More]

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Curmudgeonry in the 21st Century

Most definitions of the word are done by people who are not curmudgeons, so therefore have little to no significance in reality.

Mark Twain may have been the best example. A person with experience and insight and little patience to gloss over the silliness most people accept. To most, this comes off as “grumpy , ill tempered old man”. What else could be expected from the safe spaces, participation trophy crowd? (Female Curmudgeonry has a very different persona but shares the outcomes described here.)... [Read More]

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Sacred Names

Nomen Sacrum” is the term used for certain abbreviations that are found in ancient manuscripts of the New Testament books. These abbreviations for the “sacred names” are well known by church historians, theologians and text critics but not much known outside of those circles. I thought that Christian Ratburghers would be interested in the way the earliest Christian scribes abbreviated the names for God and Jesus.

This post is a follow-up to my post last month, which was a book review of The Earliest Christian Artifacts, by Larry Hurtado.   That book was a historian reporting on what he found when he spent some time speaking with the papyrologists who study the earliest New Testament manuscripts, and what he saw when he examined these precious fragments of early Christian culture.

Continue reading “Sacred Names”

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This Week’s Book Review – The War for the Sea: A Maritime History of World War II

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.

Book Review

Readers to discover, understand World War II’s naval battles

By MARK LARDAS... [Read More]

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Constitutional Barr

Attorney General William P. Barr spoke to the Federalist Society.   They have not yet released a transcript.   This speech is not as long as the speech he gave last month at Notre Dame.  It is very much worth your listening time.

Continue reading “Constitutional Barr”

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College Football 2019 – Week 11

Well, I’m back. And so is college football for another week of gridiron excitement!

Out west in the Pac-12, the Washington Huskies 🐺 dispatched the Oregon State Beavers ⚫️🟠 by a score of 19-7 on Friday night. On Saturday evening, Mike Leach and the Washington State Cougars 🐆 will be on the road playing the California Golden Bears 🐻. The #7 Oregon Ducks 🦆 are on the bye.... [Read More]

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A heads up for veterans..

Just a head’s up for vets.
I did my active duty between May 20 1970 and August 18 1972.
After that, about 11 years of reserves.
Brothers in arms, thank you for your service.

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