This Week’s Book Review – Vanguard: The True Stories of the Reconnaissance and Intelligence Missions Behind D-Day

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.... [Read More]

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Women Statues in NYC

The First Lady of New York City, Chirlane McCray, decided to do something about the fact that there are very few statues of women in the city. She asked New Yorkers to nominate females that were worthy of having a statue in New York. The most nominated woman was Mother Frances Cabrini. Cabrini is a Catholic saint. She came to New York in the 1800’s and set up missions for Italian immigrants. Italian Americans have had a huge impact on the city and Mother Cabrini played an important role in assisting this immigrant community.

When finally selecting seven statue-worthy women, McCray left Cabrini off her list. Many in the Italian American community felt slighted. Actor Chazz Palminteri went so far as calling McCray a racist for snubbing the Italian woman. Now McCray is married to Bill de Blasio, so maybe she hasn’t had a great example of Italian Americans. Still, is the mother of two half Italian kids really racists against Italians? Let’s take a look at who did make the cut.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – All The Houses Were Painted White: Historic Homes of the Texas Golden Crescent

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.... [Read More]

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Papyrus Manuscripts

You learned in school how the Egyptians took the pith from papyrus sedges and used it to make a writing product like paper. We study ancient Egyptian society because they were literate and left a lot of written records. Also, their dry climate preserves papyrus, so that Egypt has yielded a lot of ancient writings. This makes Egypt a favorite field of archaeological study.

Some of the most-studied artifacts of the ancient world are papyrus copies of New Testament books. Scholars study, debate, quarrel, and publish frequently regarding these precious bits of early Christian culture.

        Christian “book culture”

There are some interesting things that can be learned about the early Christians from their manuscripts. This is to pass along a few things I have learned that may be of use to some of you.

Continue reading “Papyrus Manuscripts”

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This Week’s Book Review – The Walls Have Ears

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.... [Read More]

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This Week’s Book Review – The New Battle for the Atlantic

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.... [Read More]

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Sixty Years Ago: First to the Moon

Luna 2, Soviet lunar impact spacecraftLast July, we celebrated Apollo 11, which performed the first manned landing on the Moon on July 20th, 1969.  This month marks the sixtieth anniversary of the first landing on the Moon, and the first spacecraft from Earth to touch another body in the solar system.

On September 12th, 1959, the Soviet Union launched Luna 2 toward the Moon.  This was the fifth Soviet attempt to launch a spacecraft to impact the Moon.  The first three failed during launch.  The fourth, Luna 1, missed the Moon by 5965 km and went into orbit around the Sun.  Luna 2, an identical spacecraft, was launched on a direct trajectory to the Moon by a booster designated 8K72, which used the R-7 ballistic missile (the same type which launched Sputnik) to launch an upper stage called Block E, which boosted the spacecraft toward the Moon.  The launch used a direct trajectory, Jules Verne-style, which did not enter either Earth or Moon orbit, but instead travelled directly from launch to impact on the lunar surface.... [Read More]

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Red China in 1962

In 1962, NBC News aired a one-hour “White Paper” hosted by Chet Huntley titled “Red China”, which attempted to provide a look into what had been a largely closed society since the 1949 revolution, and especially since the start of the  “Great Leap Forward” in 1958.  The first half of the documentary traced the history of China from the time of the communist takeover in 1949 to the present using stock footage.

... [Read More]

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Iron Men

Watching sports like football is the closest the average man comes to the contemplation of eternal things. The game is one of the only places left where we still find cheating to be cheating. We find glory in what is earned. We find corruption and repentance, honor, competence, vanity, and genuine humility.” – Father James V. Schall (1928-2019)

Father Schall, a prominent Catholic philosopher from Georgetown University, died earlier this year at the age of ninety-one.  At the time of Schall’s birth, American football was nearing the end of its childhood.  In the 1930s, football would begin to emerge as one of this country’s most popular sports.... [Read More]

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Review: War Is a Racket

“War Is a Racket” by Smedley ButlerSmedley Butler knew a thing or two about war. In 1898, a little over a month before his seventeenth birthday, he lied about his age and enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps, which directly commissioned him a second lieutenant. After completing training, he was sent to Cuba, arriving shortly after the end of the Spanish-American War. Upon returning home, he was promoted to first lieutenant and sent to the Philippines as part of the American garrison. There, he led Marines in combat against Filipino rebels. In 1900 he was deployed to China during the Boxer Rebellion and was wounded in the Gaselee Expedition, being promoted to captain for his bravery.

He then served in the “Banana Wars” in Central America and the Caribbean. In 1914, during a conflict in Mexico, he carried out an undercover mission in support of a planned U.S. intervention. For his command in the battle of Veracruz, he was awarded the Medal of Honor. Next, he was sent to Haiti, where he commanded Marines and Navy troops in an attack on Fort Rivière in November 1915. For this action, he won a second Medal of Honor. To this day, he is only one of nineteen people to have twice won the Medal of Honor.... [Read More]

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Book Review: The Creature from Jekyll Island

“The Creature from Jekyll Island” by G. Edward GriffinAlmost every time I review a book about or discuss the U.S. Federal Reserve System in a conversation or Internet post, somebody recommends this book. I’d never gotten around to reading it until recently, when a couple more mentions of it pushed me over the edge. And what an edge that turned out to be. I cannot recommend this book to anybody; there are far more coherent, focussed, and persuasive analyses of the Federal Reserve in print, for example Ron Paul’s excellent book End the Fed. The present book goes well beyond a discussion of the Federal Reserve and rambles over millennia of history in a chaotic manner prone to induce temporal vertigo in the reader, discussing the history of money, banking, political manipulation of currency, inflation, fractional reserve banking, fiat money, central banking, cartels, war profiteering, bailouts, monetary panics and bailouts, nonperforming loans to “developing” nations, the Rothschilds and Rockefellers, booms and busts, and more.

The author is inordinately fond of conspiracy theories. As we pursue our random walk through history and around the world, we encounter:... [Read More]

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Air Raid!

The date was October 26, 1985 and the place was the great West Texas city of El Paso. I was ten years old and in the fifth grade, and like most El Pasoans was looking forward to the upcoming college basketball season. The UTEP (University of Texas at El Paso) Miners basketball team, coached by the legendary Don Haskins, was the pride and joy of the Sun City. They regularly ranked in the AP Top Twenty (as the rankings were then called) and were expected to not only compete for a Western Athletic Conference (WAC) championship every year, but to also go deep into the NCAA Tournament.

Expectations for UTEP Miners football, by contrast, were lower. Much lower. Gridiron-wise, UTEP was college football Siberia: a place where coaching careers went to die. Such was the fate that loomed over head coach Bill Yung during the fall of 1985. The Miners were 0-6 and the team they were slated to play on that last weekend of October was none other than the #7-ranked Cougars of Brigham Young University (BYU), the defending national champions. Everyone, and I mean everyone, was expecting a blowout. Coach Yung likely felt the same way, but not his young offensive coordinator, a native of San Antonio named Hal Mumme (pronounced “mummy”). For some time, Mumme had been studying BYU’s passing plays, in particular a play called the Y-cross, which the Cougars never expected to see used against them. But Mumme did, and that plus an inspired Miners defense resulted in a shocking upset over BYU, 23-16.... [Read More]

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The Fullness of Time and Diaspora

A few weeks ago, in my “New religiongeschichtliche Schule” post, Hypatia made an observation that prompted this post. She observed that many people think that Jesus appeared at the time he did because God had devised a world in which the Gospel could spread rapidly and far and wide:

Christianity could not have arisen except out of the Jewish scriptures.  Nor, I learned in  my Bible class, could it have spread across the globe if it hadn’t arisen within the far-flung empire of Rome.  That period was “ the fullness of time”.

I absolutely agree with this thinking, and want to make a few observations on point.

Continue reading “The Fullness of Time and Diaspora”

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