Best Selling Album Ever

https://www.thewrap.com/the-eagles-greatest-hits-michael-jackson-thriller-record/

The best selling album is The Eagles’ “Greatest Hits 1971-1975. Thriller by Michael Jackson no longer has the title.

What is your number one Eagles’ tune?

Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975
Disc 1:
Take It Easy
Witchy Woman
Lyin’ Eyes
Already Gone
Desperado
One Of These Nights
Tequila Sunrise
Take It To The Limit
Peaceful Easy Feeling
The Best Of My Love
Eagles Greatest Hits Volume 2
Disc 2:
Hotel California
Heartache Tonight
Seven Bridges Road (Live Version)
Victim Of Love
The Sad Cafe
Life In The Fast Lane
I Can’t Tell You Why
New Kid In Town
The Long Run
After The Thrill Is Gone


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Monday Meals, August 20: Mom’s Meatloaf

As of late Saturday evening, I’ve been visiting my 80-year-old mother, who is recovering from a severe broken leg (eight weeks ago, spiral break of the femur just above the knee — plate and ten screws).  My mom is in remarkably good shape, and is actually a couple weeks ahead of schedule in her recovery, having been allowed to put 40lbs of foot pressure on the leg this week.  She’s still homebound (no stairs allowed), but there’s light at the end of the tunnel now.

Anyways, my mom and I fell into an informal tradition years ago where she would make me a tuna-fish casserole, 70’s retro-style (corn flakes on top instead of crushed potato chips), any time I’d visit, after once expressing delight (actual) when she made it.  Apparently, I’m the only one of her seven children that is fond of it.  I live outside of Atlanta, and she’s in the woods of Western Maine, so it doesn’t happen all that often.  I fully expected her to make one for me on Sunday, to be the subject of this post.  It didn’t happen — she can’t do her own groceries, and the last sibling to do so failed to note that mom had cleaned out her tuna supply. /-:

The fallback plan was her low-carb meatloaf recipe:

Continue reading “Monday Meals, August 20: Mom’s Meatloaf”


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Guilty Pleasure: Kennedy Steve

There was an air traffic controller at JFK who did his job superbly and had fun while doing it. If one has listened to ATC they say the same things over and over again. There voices can be lifeless. An air traffic at JFK named Steve was known for mixing it up a bit which kept it interesting.  I like the following exchange.(At 1:00)

British Airways Pilot: ….. which way do you like us to face? (After a airplane pushes from the gate they are told which direction is best to taxi.)

Steve: Oh face the front, sir. If you’re flying  facing the passengers, they get very concerned.

BAP: Touche

Steve: Err, but the push back, sir, the nose is SE.

BAP: SE, thanks.

Steve: Ah, come on, you got to admit that it was slightly humorous!?

BAP:  It’s hilarious, we’re crying with laughter here.

 

The sad news is Kennedy Steve retired and I doubt there will be another like him.

Life goes a whole lot easier when a person puts some life and creativity in their job. A little fun can go a long way.

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TOTD 2018-8-19: Fighting War World II

I remember a friend telling me that WW2 was fought with paper and typewriters. That got me thinking of the other things that were lacking that we take for granted. Here is a list.

  1. Pallets and Containers (They used a lot of cargo nets at that time. A lot was moved by  hand.)
  2. Copy machines (I think carbon paper did most of this work.)
  3. Cell phones (They had walkie-talkies but they were cumbersome.)
  4. Helicopters (It took a lot of time to get the wounded to the hospital.)
  5. E-mail (People wrote letters that took weeks or longer to get to people.)
  6. Good weather forecasts (This can really help if you are in the middle of an ocean.)

What am I missing? Oh, there was no CNN.


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Enemy of the People 2018-08-16

Today we were treated to a burst of collusion by the lamestream media.   For the past week, the Boston Globe has been encouraging journalists to publish editorials today that would condemn President Trump for calling the “fake news media” the “enemy of the people.”   Somewhere around 350 editorials were published today in answer to the Boston Globe’s call.   There were also a handful of editorials that opined that this collective effort would surely backfire and only prove Trump’s allegation that the journalists are partisan Leftists and “the Opposition Party.”

So, Ratburghers, did you bother to read any of these editorials?

Did you see any new points that you had not already heard many times?

Did you see any really good examples of arguments against President Trump?   Any criticisms that seemed to be helpful or useful to the public discourse over the battles between Team Trump and mass media?

Have you heard any conversations triggered by this effort at a collective rebuke of President Trump?

My thinking is that this is a really small deal.   Nobody will be persuaded to think differently than they already did.


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We are at 19,039 Comments

I know I was wrong when I thought the site would be destroyed at R1K, 1000 Posts but this is different. Please buy my new book, “20,000 Reasons Why We Are Doomed” at the Ratburger gift shop. It has actual math inside. I figure we only have a few weeks left. It was nice knowing everyone. (I don’t mean everyone but it sounds nicer.)


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Book Mention: A River in Darkness . . .

. . . One Man’s Escape from North Korea is the memoir of Masaji Ishikawa, born in Japan in 1947, taken to North Korea by his parents at the age of thirteen, who survived, to escape in 1996.

His father, a native of southern Korea, had been virtually kidnapped by the Imperial Japanese during the colonial period and taken to Japan to bolster the labor force. His mother, Japanese with education and prospects, nonetheless went along with the plan to take the family to North Korea in 1960. Why did she agree to this? I have no answer.

Why did his father consider such a plan? His father was not allowed to assimilate, study, or advance. An organization of Koreans in Japan worked on people in his situation to get them to answer the call of Kim Il-sung to come to North Korea and enjoy paradise on earth. They got on that boat, were dumped off onto a cold concrete floor, and hell began.

So who organized these boats? Let the man tell the story:

After Kim Il-sung’s statement, the General Association of Korean Residents started a mass repatriation campaign in the guise of humanitarianism.  The following year, 1959, the Japanese Red Cross Society and the Korean Red Cross Society secretly negotiated a “Return Agreement” in Calcutta.

Secretly? Calcutta?

Four months later, the first shipload of returnees left the Japanese port of Niigata.  Shortly after that, people affiliated with the League of Koreans in Japan started showing up on our doorstep, eager to persuade us to make the journey.  They were all in favor of mass repatriation. 

Did the International Committee of the Red Cross know anything about this? Did the United States?  The UN?  Yes, yes, and yes.  And what did they do about it?  Nothing.

The Wayback Machine dredged up a 2007 article in Japan Focus, which contains a great deal of Cold War history related to this mass emigration. Big players were busying themselves with Cold War tactics, strategies, and what sound like games, while refraining from blinking a few times and actually looking at what they were actually doing. Here is one snip from the dense and informative piece:

The US appears to have been unaware of the secret contacts between Japan and North Korea in 1956 and 1957. When it first became aware of the repatriation plan a couple of years later, the Eisenhower administration regarded it with concern. But once the Japanese and North Korean Red Cross Societies reached an agreement on a mass “return” in mid-1959, the Eisenhower administration did not take any practical steps to halt the unfolding tragedy.

US Ambassador in Tokyo Douglas MacArthur II (who played a key role on the US side) told his Australian counterpart in 1959 that the “American Embassy had checked Japanese opinion and found it was almost unanimously in favour of ‘getting rid of the Koreans'”. At this sensitive moment in US-Japan relations, the State Department was clearly cautious of intervening in a scheme that was an obvious vote-winner for the Kishi regime.

There is a well-written essay on a personal blog called This Angelena, giving detailed summary as well as a feel for the tragedy, the crimes, and the suffering.

A 2004 Japan Times report of his attempt to re-enter North Korea to rescue his sons includes a frank allusion to continuing problems:

Since returning home, Miyazaki [Ishikawa’s pen name in Japan] has blamed the mass media for fouling up his rescue operation by bringing his activities to the attention of Chinese authorities, who considered them illegal.

Amazon published this memoir in early 2018; it is available in multiple formats. My reading was of the Kindle edition, which had nothing objectionable in the formatting.


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