Colorado v Christians

The process is the punishment.   Just a couple of weeks after the Supreme Court ended a six-year legal ordeal, the Human Rights Commission of the State of Colorado has started a new investigation of Jack Phillips the Christian Baker who owns the Masterpiece Cakeshop.

The complainant is a transgender person, who requested a birthday cake to celebrate “the 7th-year anniversary of my transition from male to female.”

Now this is harassment of a businessman for trying to exercise his traditionalist Christianity in his shop.   Even though the legal fees will be donated, this man has spent six years of time in a stressful series of hearings, interviews, interrogations, depositions, and other miscellaneous court proceedings, plus time spent with his own legal team.   He has been facing bankruptcy the entire time as the weight of the State of Colorado makes it difficult for him to tend to his family and his business.

When Leftists scoff that Christians are not under threat in America, Jack Phillips is exhibit A of the rebuttal.    He has just filed for a federal injunction against the Colorado Human Rights Commission.

“Colorado continues its practice of treating Phillips worse than other cake artists because it despises his religious beliefs and how he practices his faith,” the lawsuit claims.


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Eve and the Snake

I went with my husband to his lovely 150-year-old Episcopal church, St. Paul’s, this morning for Mass. I’m Catholic, but we both go to each other’s churches frequently, and we know many Catholic-Episcopal couples who do the same.

After Mass at coffee hour  we chatted with Cathy, a spry 81-year old lady who was coming to St. Paul’s for the first time in about 30 years — she’s been attending an Episcopal church closer to where she lives, but that parish has a priest who, after about 2 years there, has gradually done away with a number of their time-honored bake sales, special services and events, and instead is talking non-stop about social justice and how white people have to acknowledge their inherent racism. Cathy said it’s driving her and a number of her friends away, and she was hoping St. Paul’s was different; she’d heard Fr. Daniel is an upbeat, traditional young man with a friendly wife and four little children, which I can attest is true. Cathy says she’ll be coming back now to St. Paul’s.

Later at home my husband reminded me he’d heard a similar story from a friend who plays the organ at yet another lovely little Episcopal church a half hour away. That church too has a rather newly-hired priest who, our organist friend says, has eliminated their beautiful traditional music, changed the service and is also vocal  about social justice. The organist is actively searching for a new position in a  church that appreciates the beauty of traditional sacred music.

I remember when the priest before Fr. Daniel was hired at St. Paul’s (Episcopal parishes interview and hire their own priests when there is a vacancy.) That priest also went along for a year or two with the traditions in the parish, then slowly started to bend or weed out traditional things that some parishioners were quite fond of, and a number of people left the congregation as a result. There were several Masses I attended back then that had distinctly social justice-flavored sermons, and I visited much less frequently as those sermons became the norm.

I shake my head sadly when I think of this: all three of these Episcopal social justice warrior priests are women. And I think a snake has taken up residence in the seminary.

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What if all focused on giving and receiving Joy?

Right now, it seems like all the forces are focused on bringing anger to the world. Imagine if each of us, instead of worrying about what others are doing wrong, spent all that energy focused on bringing Joy to others. Imagine, when someone tries to bring joy to us, we are able to actually accept it.

It is easier to focus on what is wrong. It is easier to hate another, and to be honest, to hate what we don’t like about ourselves. Our brains look for what is going off, so we can protect. But if we charge around in protection mode all the time, we are not doing more than just staying alive. It is not living and thriving.

I am going to try to focus on giving Joy and Receiving it more. I need God to help me on this one.


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Media v Evangelicals 2018 part 7

Things have been sort of quiet since my last installment in this series, what with our mass media consumed 24/7 by Trump, Russians, Mueller, Manafort, and Michael Cohen. However there were a few items that might have slipped your notice.

A historian had a book tour. Eerdmans Publishing hooked John Fea up with a tour to promote Believe Me: The Evangelical Road To Donald Trump. This got a mild round of approving articles in the usual spaces. The book is evidently pretty dry, because if it had any juice he would have been treated to a higher-profile tour.

An evangelical Christian himself, Fea argues that the embrace of Donald Trump is the logical outcome of a long-standing evangelical approach to public life defined by the politics of fear, the pursuit of worldly power, and a nostalgic longing for an American past.  As insightful as it is timely, Fea’s  Believe Me  challenges Christians to replace fear with hope, the pursuit of power with humility, and nostalgia with history.

The book is loaded with all the old slanders against traditionalist Christians from the 18th century as well as more recent slanders. I can tell this from reviews, comments and an interview with the author; I have not read the book. It has become tedium that mass media like to pass along repetitive instances of liberal “Christians” criticizing traditionalist Christians using Bible passages.

Along that same line there was a book by a liberal Evangelical pastor named Rob Schenck, who told his personal testimony about how he converted from pro-life to pro-abortion. SSDD.

I saw a few new articles from some of my favorites about the press’s general ignorance of religion and religious issues. They are clueless and it shows. Sometimes their ignorance is good for a laugh.

The most recent instance of note was a long feature in the Washington Post. It is a profile of the Trump voters in a Baptist church in Alabama.

The presidency of Donald Trump has created unavoidable moral dilemmas not just for the members of First Baptist in Luverne but for a distinct subset of Christians who are overwhelmingly white, overwhelmingly evangelical and more uniformly pro-Trump than any other part of the American electorate.”

Gee, well, I suppose we can guess where this one is headed, can’t we?

So of course it is larded with the buzzwords you would expect. “Awkwardness” “predicament,” “self-reflection” and “compromising” give way to “whiffing on the big moral questions.” Problematic race history issues in the Southern Baptist Church are dredged up, just to whip up the outragey feels of this mess. Along the way is mixed in a journalism smattering of local color quotes of country Baptist people saying Christian things and saying country things and commenting on President Trump.

In a really nice turn, the reporter (Stephanie McCrummen) gave some space to a member who gave a great statement that is perhaps representative:

There was Terry Drew, who sat in the seventh pew on the left side, who knew and agreed with Trump’s position, and knew that supporting him involved a blatant moral compromise.

I hate it,” he said. “My wife and I talk about it all the time. We rationalize the immoral things away. We don’t like it, but we look at the alternative, and think it could be worse than this.”

The only way to understand how a Christian like him could support a man who boasted about grabbing women’s crotches, Terry said, was to understand how he felt about the person Trump was still constantly bringing up in his speeches and who loomed large in Terry’s thoughts: Hillary Clinton, whom Terry saw as “sinister” and “evil” and “I’d say, of Satan.”

She hates me,” Terry said, sitting in [Pastor] Crum’s office one day. “She has contempt for people like me, … and people who love God and believe in the Second Amendment. I think if she had her way it would be a dangerous country for the likes of me.”

Way to go, Washington Post. Him who has ears, let him hear. You may mock and scoff at these rubes all you like, but they see clearly what the Nevers on the Coast missed by a mile.

This long feature has a sub-plot about Pastor Crum preaching a series on the Ten Commandments, with a buildup to his sermon on Adultery. In the end the reporter was disappointed, as her readers will be, that Pastor Crum did not preach about President Trump. But in the end I think this feature is worth reading, with a very uneven mix of quotes from parishioners. In the early going I thought it was going to be simply another hit job, but it is better than that. You can still tell that the viewpoint of these simple Christians is foreign to the reporter and her organization.

I will put links in the comments. One link will be to media criticism of a Frank Bruni editorial in the New York Times, in which he describes what a dangerous ogre the theocrat Mike Pence is, on account of he believes things that traditionalist Christians always believed. Typical.


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TOTD 2018-07-27: The Limits of Religious Freedom

Religious freedom is a powerful and vital right.  More than any other right, it dethrones the State, placing it subordinate to the conscience of the individual and the Supreme Being he chooses to acknowledge.   This is why the Left cannot stand it – they cannot bear the competition.  Only the Party and the State  can define meaning – in essence, they want to establish Leftism as State religion, and block the free exercise of any other faith.  Social Justice is indeed a jealous god, wrathful and merciless.

That said, there are limits to religious freedom.  You cannot claim that heinous crimes are justified by your religion and expect to get away with it – no sacrificing children to Moloch (unless they are aborted fetuses).  You need some degree of common sense restrictions – you cannot form the Church of Rockso and claim tax exemption along with having cocaine consumption as a sacrament.  This is all common knowledge.

Now for a tougher situation.  The Church of Scientology is a fairly small, but extremely rich organization.  It does not acknowledge a supreme being, nor does engage in much charitable activity.  More than anything else, it resembles a corrupt business selling self-help techniques, while using mental manipulation to control its members.  The abuses and cruelties of this organization have been well-documented – there are numerous books, a documentary movie, and even a TV series.

When the Church of Scientology is challenged, they run behind their tax exempt status, which was obtained by a relentless campaign of harassment against the IRS.  Eventually, the IRS bowed down before Scientology and its sociopathic leader, granting them a tax exemption.  So now the IRS is cast as official arbiter of whether or not some group is a religion.   While there is discussion that Donald Trump and Treasury Secretary Mnuchin have some interest in changing this, Scientology regularly swats away lawsuits  with the stamp of approval they extorted from the US government.  How do we work to break the power of this vile organization, without jeopardizing all religious freedom.

If that was a thorny issue, this one is acid-coated razor wire.  Political Islam is very tightly related with religious Islam, and Political Islam is blatantly incompatible with Western democracy.  Yet there are vast numbers of Muslims who like the good life in the US, and do not want to make women wear sacks and decapitate everyone who disagrees.   On the other hand, we see the continuing problem of Sudden Jihad Syndrome.  Some scumbag watches some ISIS videos online, then decides to kill as many people as possible.

I understand that some people here think all Muslims need to be expelled from the US.  I have had close co-workers who are practicing Muslims, and other Muslim acquaintances (even a guy named Jihad!) and I just can’t square kicking all of them out  (much less killing them) with freedom of religion.  CAIR and the various other terrorist-hugging mounds of porcine excrement certainly should get treated as enemy agents.  I want people facing treason charges and similar treatment to Nazi agents in WWII.  That still leaves a lot of people who follow Mecca Islam (to use Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s phrase) and have no real interest in decapitation.  Do we need to toss them out?  Hell, the Left hates us more than ISIS does.  Can we trust that they would not expel Evangelicals if they had the chance?

That said, we do need to be mindful of the people following Medina Islam, and who are inclined to dominate or destroy us.  How do we address this problem?


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LGBTQ routs Catholics in Boston

The Catholic Diocese of Boston has quietly conceded defeat and did not put up a fight.   The St. Patrick’s Day Parade of Boston is now a green copy of the Gay Pride Parade.   The triumphant Mayor Walsh has just installed the leader of the front group he created as leader of parade arrangements for the 2019 parade.   When I search for “St. Patrick’s Day Parade” at the diocesan website, there are no results.

BOSTON – MARCH 15: Massachusetts Congressman Seth Moulton marches with OUTVETS, a non-profit that highlights the rights and contributions of LGBTQ veterans, active service members, and their families. Long snubbed gay rights groups finally marched in South Boston’s famed St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 15, 2015. Because of this inclusion, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh and other politicians chose to march for the first time in support. (Photo by Dina Rudick/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

The group OUTVETS was formed in 2014 by Walsh for the purpose of forcing an LBTQ presence into the parade.   Here is an excerpt from a recent press release by the Catholic Action League:

The Catholic Action League of Massachusetts today renewed its call to remove the name of Saint Patrick from the Evacuation Day/Saint Patrick’s Day Parade in South Boston. Yesterday, the organizers of the parade—the South Boston Allied War Veterans Council—announced that they had hired Bryan Bishop, the CEO of the homosexual organization OUTVETS, as the Director of Parade Operations. This decision means that Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, will now, effectively, control the parade.

OUTVETS was created in July, 2014 as part of Mayor Walsh’s campaign to force parade organizers to admit homosexual groups to the line of march. It was the third such contrivance fabricated for this purpose since 1992. Since 2015, OUTVETS has been marching in the parade with banners identifying their sexual behavior.

In 1995, the Veterans Council, under the leadership of the late John J. “Wacko” Hurley, and represented by Attorney Chester Darling, won a hard fought, 9-0 victory before the United States Supreme Court in Hurley v. GLIB, a decision which affirmed the constitutional right of parade organizers to control the message and content of their own parade.

During the 2013 Boston mayoral election, however, then State Representative Walsh promised homosexual activists that, if elected, he would compel the Veterans Council to reverse their position. Shortly after taking office in January, 2014, Walsh began a campaign of intimidation which included threats to boycott the parade, threats to withhold city permits, claims that the Boston Police could not prevent violent disruptions of the parade, and personally shouting, in a public forum, threats and obscenities at parade marshal Phil Wuschke.

In December 2014, with Hurley infirm and absent, a minority on the Veterans Council, led by former Boston police officer Brian Mahoney, and current City Councilor Ed Flynn, seized control of the organization and colluded with Walsh to admit OUTVETS. Flynn would be elected to the City Council in 2015 with support from allies of the mayor.

For many decades the theme of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade could be characterized as “Irish heritage + American values + Catholic religion.”

Currently the parade theme is better characterized as “Irish heritage + triumphant anti-Christian sexual confusion.”


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Detective time: can you find the lie?

I came across this New York Times article about abortion and wanted to show it to you. It is by somebody named Cindi Leivi and it is called, “Let’s Talk About My Abortion (and Yours).”

If you like playing detective, I’d like you to read it, and to try to find the lie that I see. The lie I’m referring to is a big lie, actually, but if you’re not paying attention you might breeze right past it. So think carefully as you read. I will put the lie below. Here is a hint: it appears in the first half of the essay. Continue reading “Detective time: can you find the lie?”


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Media v Evangelicals, 2018 part 6

I recently posted about events in the Southern Baptist Convention Annual Meeting. This was not a media-generated thing; it was a genuine grass-roots uprising that gained strength after the Washington Post took it up. It cannot be considered a media-fueled problem. However, it is worth noting that Baptist media lean left and helped push a Progressive into the office of President of the Southern Baptist Convention.

I suppose the lesson there is that journalists lean left, even when they work for theologically conservative publications.

And now to continue my periodic reviews of the ongoing media campaign against theologically conservative Christians. The Trump era has seen the media focus on Evangelicals. Well, these things go in cycles, I suppose. I am not alleging any conspiracy; it is just that journalists think alike and are prone to groupthink and herd mentality. Also, they swarm like piranha when they think they smell blood in the water, so if there is any appearance of a potential issue that could be used to wedge President Trump away from his Evangelicals base, they dive in and start muckraking with great energy.

The New York Times published a feature/ exposé/ hit piece that focused on David Brody and the Christian Broadcasting Network. Their article is one of those anthropological looks at the primitives who voted for President Trump. Rather than give a link to their execrable site, you can learn stuff you didn’t already know by checking out the review by my favorite media critics:

https://www.getreligion.org/getreligion/2018/5/14/old-news-the-new-york-times-discovers-david-brody-and-cbns-niche-audience-power

The New York Times thinks of David Brody as a special “kind of PR man,” as Terry Mattingly put it in his review of their article. But Brody is just a good reporter, doing good reporting, who happens to enjoy great access to the Trump White House because his reporting is favorable instead of hostile. Mostly his reporting is neutral, but the mass media “Opposition Party” coverage of Trump and the Trump Administration has been so hostile that neutral looks like favorable to both them and President Trump.

Well, gee whiz, of course Christians are tuned into Christian niche media. That is because mass media is an anti-Christian swamp of Leftism.

Pro-Trump Evangelicals only get traction in Christian niche media. Here is an example that is worth your while:

https://www.onenewsnow.com/church/2018/05/27/evangelical-leaders-trump-is-generations-most-faith-friendly-pres

You can contrast that with another hit piece. This one is an LA Times op ed about Evangelical churches are leaner and meaner, bloc voting in ways that overmatch the “nones”; The LA Times is distressed that the “none of the above religion” crowd doesn’t pull more weight at the ballot box.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-sager-loskota-evangelical-20180531-story.html

And here is a newspaper editorial that takes offense. They are handwringing because Christian niche media exists.

http://www.newsobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article211899489.html

Also, Leftist mass media continued to promote and celebrate liberal “Christians” who whine and complain about traditionalists who actually believe the Bible and try to live accordingly. Last month I wrote about the coverage of an anti-traditionalist group of liberal “Red Letter Christians” and their “Reclaiming Jesus” manifesto. Coverage continued, fueled partly because several of the signers went on tours to promote their latest books.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/christian-leaders-call-out-the-heresy-of-trumpism/2018/05/23/00f026c2-5eb5-11e8-9ee3-49d6d4814c4c_story.html?utm_term=.e8ae950ca3a9

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/23/us/anti-trump-evangelicals-lynchburg.html

 

Here are two very different Christian reactions to “Reclaiming Jesus”

https://www.onenewsnow.com/church/2018/05/21/religious-lingo-a-misguided-effort-to-erode-trumps-evangelical-base

https://cruxnow.com/church-in-the-usa/2018/05/26/christian-crowd-vows-to-reclaim-jesus-from-polarized-u-s/

And there was a press release from Gallup with polling on Evangelical voters. There was a small amount of media coverage, but I didn’t see anything worth sharing. Here is Gallup’s blog post.

http://news.gallup.com/opinion/polling-matters/235208/things-know-evangelicals-america.aspx

Every now and then we remark about how Leftism is a religion. Journalists have polled as 85 percent or so “no religion” or Atheist in surveys. But they are not irreligious. They are Leftists. It should not be surprising that, once the fig leaf of neutrality is pulled away, their naked hostility to traditionalist religions is on display.


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Southern Baptist Story 2018

A few weeks ago we learned that the Social Justice Warrior element in the Southern Baptist Convention is much more powerful than we had thought. The Southern Baptist Convention is hugely influential on the population of “Evangelical voters,” so all of us have an interest in this unsettling development.

Paige Patterson was dismissed from his job as head of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas. He was caught up in the #MeToo-for-Evangelicals excitement. In part, the fallout from anti-Patterson social media activism resulted in the election of J.D. Greear as the new President of the Southern Baptist Convention.

The events of the past two months were the culmination of a campaign that began in 2014. Paige Patterson gave a speech to the Awaken Conference that year. Awaken Conference is a youth conference. There was immediate push-back against Patterson’s sermon. The chattering went around and around in Baptist circles on the internet, and triggered a build-up that prompted a number of women to start dishing about slights from Paige Patterson.

The story had legs. It turned out that Paige Patterson has very old-fashioned ideas about complementarianism, which in part are reactionary to modern feminism. In that 2014 sermon, he brought up the translation of the Hebrew words used in Genesis for God making the man, and making the woman. The verbs are different words. The word used for God making the woman is a word that implies care of construction details and aesthetics.

I didn’t need to learn Hebrew to figure that out, either,” Patterson quipped.

He went on to tell a story about an angry woman who had just heard him speak who was “giving me what for” while her teenage son and a friend stood nearby.

About that time, a very attractive young co-ed walked by,” Patterson said. “She wasn’t more than about 16, but let me just say that she was nice.”

Thinking nobody was paying attention, Patterson said, the son commented to his friend, “Man, is she built.”

In the middle of the sentence she stopped, wheeled around, slapped a hand over his mouth, loosened his teeth and said ‘Young man, don’t you ever say anything like that again,’” Patterson said. “If you do, I’ll mop up the face of the earth with you.”

Patterson took it as an opportunity. “I said, ‘Ma’am, leave him alone,’” he said. “He is just being biblical. That’s exactly what the Bible says.”

It might help to understand that Paige Patterson was one of the leaders of the “conservative purge” that began in 1979 and continued through the 1980s in the Southern Baptist Convention. Since he is known as a conservative leader he makes an attractive target for the liberals.

His remarks were called “unbiblical” and “misogynistic.” They went around the internet, gathering steam, building an anti-Patterson movement. Then women started to tell stories about Patterson slighting women’s complaints about sexual harassment on campus that they alleged had not been treated properly by Patterson. Evidently he was like lots of administrators, a little too concerned about his institution, and perhaps not concerned enough about females, especially if he thought they had sort of invited bad behavior on the part of men.

But more stories came out, and more women got riled. The most damning of all was when a former student from when Patterson was at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary went to the Washington Post with her story from 2003. The Washington Post put two very capable, and hostile, female reporters on the story. They reported from the point of view of the women on full outragey attack mode against Patterson and all theologically conservative Baptists and the Southern Baptist Convention. This was not a media-generated problem for Patterson or for the Southern Baptist Convention, but Big Media attention did add a lot of pressure.

Their reporting is actually very good:

Then this spring came the case of a former Southeastern student named Megan Lively, who was 24 in 2003 when she says she was assaulted by a man she had been dating. She told The Washington Post that Patterson encouraged her not to report the incident to the police and to forgive her alleged assailant. A few days later, Southwestern trustees cited a second incident in 2015. Trustee Board Chairman Kevin Ueckert, in a June 1 statement, alleged that a Southwestern female student reported to Patterson that she had been raped, and police were called. “But in connection with that allegation,” Ueckert wrote, Patterson emailed campus security — Ueckert said trustees saw that email — and “discussed meeting with the student alone so that he could ‘break her down.’ ”

On June 4, Patterson’s attorney, Shelby Sharpe, released what he called a “character defense” that he said he compiled without any input from Patterson, just “as a person, not as his lawyer.” That document cited leaked friendly letters between the 2003 woman and Patterson in the months after the alleged rape, which Sharpe said disproved the idea that there was a rape and that Patterson mishandled it. Sharpe also said Patterson hasn’t been given access to the 2003 documents used to accuse him and hasn’t been able to defend himself. In the 2015 case, Sharpe said Southwestern trustees had seen the “break her down” email before — when rather than fire him they demoted him to president emeritus, with full benefits. He also said that the student had “given several different accounts of her story” and that Patterson “preferred there be no police presence so the young woman would not feel intimidated.”

Of course all this broke just in advance of the Southern Baptist Annual Meeting.

Patterson is out, fired, discredited and became such an embarrassment so quickly that he agreed to withdraw from a scheduled speaking slot at the Annual Meeting.

The Messengers voted 68 percent to give the presidency to a Progressive.

Of course, Baptist media also played a hand. There are several Baptist newspapers and they mostly lean left. The conservatives are making do with blogs and e-newsletters. Many of the Messengers (voting delegates) had never even heard of the conservative candidate, while J.D. Greear has been pumped by Baptist media for over two years (he was second last year to outgoing President Gaines).

In a side note, my favorite media critics noticed that the New York Times ignored the Annual Meeting until after Mike Pence spoke, and they only published then because they could write about the Messengers who voted to disinvite Pence.

The real damage here is limited. The key thing is that the Southern Baptist Convention President appoints members to boards and commissions, so a fresh cohort of liberals will be moving into decisionmaking roles in the Southern Baptist Convention.

I am not a Baptist, and would especially like to hear from any Ratburgher Baptists who would care to comment.


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Doing Rich Lady Things Like Using Uber and Seamless Are the Modern Way of Giving to the Poor

I feel guilty when I order takeout. Why? Because that’s money I could be saving for a rainy day. The frugal American we-don’t-have-servants mindset is that anything you can do for yourself, you should, and paying others to do something because you’re too lazy, is wasteful. 

When my sister’s washing machine broke, she had to send out her laundry for a while as they waited on repairs. She said, “Olive, it’s great. I may never go back. I know it’s such a Rich Lady thing to do, but….” 

I began to think: The services that we consider Rich Lady Things–Uber, Seamless, laundry service, etc.–put money in the hands of the poor. If I tip the delivery guy generously I’m putting money directly in his pocket, much more efficiently than a government entity or charity could do. 

As much as I love the church, she doesn’t take care of the poor like she’s supposed to. Mainly because the government has stepped in to do her job for her, and made her irrelevant when it comes to taking care of the needy. Church budgets primarily go for buildings, and salaries, so there’s not much left over to give to the poor anyway. 

But could paying for services that I could theoretically do, but don’t have the time or inclination, be the modern way of giving to the poor? Those who are perfectly willing to drive me to the train station, or cook my food and bring it to me, are depending on my generosity. Could it be that I actually owe them their commission and tip? I’m stingy if I have the money in my hand, but don’t give them the opportunity.

The Biblical model of giving and helping the poor is outlined in the Old Testament in “not gleaning to the edge of the field.” At harvest time, the righteous were commanded to leave a little bit of crop around the edges so that the poor could come after the reapers and gather what remained.

When you reap the harvest of your land, do not reap to the very edges of your field or gather the gleanings of your harvest. Leave them for the poor and for the foreigner residing among you. I am the LORD your God. Leviticus 23:22

This was the wealthy man’s field–his grain, his land, his laborers–but in the Biblical sense, he owed it to the poor to not reap every single inch of produce his land yielded. Leave a little bit. Around the edges. For the poor. After all, that was there only chance at gathering–they didn’t have their own land or crop.

Yes, you could rightfully command your workers to gather every single stalk, every head of grain, but don’t do it. Leave a little bit around the edges. For the poor.

Today, I could insist on doing my own cooking and cleaning, but why? In one sense it’s a way of being rigid and greedy.

When my brother goes to the bank, he gets $100 in singles, in order to tip his baristas every morning. The idea of tipping as a way of giving comes from him, who declares he does not give to charities generally. But if you go out to eat with him, you will see that he gives generously to the poor.

Thoughts? Are there any Rich Lady (or Man) things you do, that may actually benefit someone?


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