Shutting Down the Debate

Why is there such a rush to shut down conversations and individuals? Let us take the concept of shutting things down because they are not true. Good way of thinking, right? But it has always amazed me the bias that is involved. For example, if people lie in a “positive” way no one pulls out this rule and think this person needs to be silenced. Positive could mean saying nice things based on lies or it can even mean saying negative things about people who disagree with you. Someone fighting your fight is on the side of the angels and must be “truthful”.

Examples
“You have been suspended for repeatedly giving credit to the wrong person. If this happens again your suspension will be longer and lead to banning.”... [Read More]


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This Week’s Book Review – Monster Hunter Memoirs: Saints

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday.... [Read More]


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Guilty Pleasure: Kennedy Steve

There was an air traffic controller at JFK who did his job superbly and had fun while doing it. If one has listened to ATC they say the same things over and over again. There voices can be lifeless. An air traffic at JFK named Steve was known for mixing it up a bit which kept it interesting.  I like the following exchange.(At 1:00)

British Airways Pilot: ….. which way do you like us to face? (After a airplane pushes from the gate they are told which direction is best to taxi.)... [Read More]

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Curmudgeon Musings on A Milestone Task

We began a key milestone task this weekend. We started to narrow down where we will buy our last residence.

I know the usual key criteria but they all fall by the wayside:
1. Overlapping fields of fire
2. High ground
3. Good location when Yellowstone blows, or the Cascadia fault goes, or Mt St Helens does a repeat
4. Water supply
5. Ability to hinder access by explosives when the starving urban mobs roam the countryside.... [Read More]

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“Fairness” Doctrine for Social Media?

Private companies’ content censorship raises important public concerns of a magnitude meriting book-length treatment. Not here, however, and not by me. The left, for example, saw its near-absolute content control of most public media – print, broadcast, movies, education – as insufficient because of talk radio. Leftist radio programs fell flat while Rush Limbaugh, intolerably, soared to prominence. We know that tolerance has a very restricted meaning for leftists, thus their regulatory effort to quash conservative talk radio with the “fairness doctrine” was a case study in the use of state power in furtherance of their illiberal – totalitarian, actually – impulses and tactics.

The left never hesitates to enforce its rubrics, on pain of abusive name-calling (amplified by their “media”) or ruination at the hands of some public agency or other with enforcement powers. For instance, a Christian baker in Colorado is being singled out yet again.  All sense of proportion has been lost, to such an extent that definitions of basic language and process must be re-examined. Does what we have referred to as media up until now still qualify as media?... [Read More]


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TOTD 2018-8-19: Fighting War World II

I remember a friend telling me that WW2 was fought with paper and typewriters. That got me thinking of the other things that were lacking that we take for granted. Here is a list.

  1. Pallets and Containers (They used a lot of cargo nets at that time. A lot was moved by  hand.)
  2. Copy machines (I think carbon paper did most of this work.)
  3. Cell phones (They had walkie-talkies but they were cumbersome.)
  4. Helicopters (It took a lot of time to get the wounded to the hospital.)
  5. E-mail (People wrote letters that took weeks or longer to get to people.)
  6. Good weather forecasts (This can really help if you are in the middle of an ocean.)

What am I missing? Oh, there was no CNN.


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Book Review: The Dream of the Iron Dragon

“The Dream of the Iron Dragon” by Robert KroeseThe cover tells you all you need to know about this book: Vikings!—spaceships! What could go wrong? From the standpoint of a rip-roaring science fiction adventure, absolutely nothing: this masterpiece is further confirmation that we’re living in a new Golden Age of science fiction, made possible by the intensely meritocratic world of independent publishing sweeping aside the politically-correct and social justice warrior converged legacy publishers and re-opening the doors of the genre to authors who spin yarns with heroic characters, challenging ideas, and red-blooded adventure just as in the works of the grandmasters of previous golden ages.

From the standpoint of the characters in this novel, a great many things go wrong, and there the story begins. In the twenty-third century, humans find themselves in a desperate struggle with the only other intelligent species they’d encountered, the Cho-ta’an. First contact was in 2125, when a human interstellar ship was destroyed by the Cho-ta’an while exploring the Tau Ceti system. Shortly thereafter, co-ordinated attacks began on human ships and settlements which indicated the Cho-ta’an possessed faster-than-light travel, which humans did not. Humans formed the Interstellar Defense League (IDL) to protect their interests and eventually discovered and captured a Cho-ta’an jumpgate, which allowed instantaneous travel across interstellar distances. The IDL was able to reverse-engineer the gate sufficiently to build their own copies, but did not understand how it worked—it was apparently based upon some kind of wormhole physics beyond their comprehension.... [Read More]


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The Right Thing for the Right or Wrong Reason

I recently changed churches. Not in a small way, but a huge way. As a cradle Episcopalian, liturgy has become very important to me. I see the value and purpose in it. I’m very protestant when it comes to not trusting the Pope, but in some ways I might be less enthusiastic about the authority of apostolic succession given the tendency for these hierarchical churches to promote less than qualified priests.

I’m now attending a Baptist church. To call it a culture shock would be an understatement, but the teaching is sound, draws from our current culture and philosophies without politicization, and the fellowship is strong and in the neighborhood. Three things that had been lacking in the other Episcopal options.... [Read More]


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A Love Story

A Love Story

It was a beautiful day in Japan. The remnants of a typhoon had cleared out the day before, leaving a fresh clear air to roast dry in the blazing sun. Yet the temperature was not so bad, as the typhoon had departed to the northeast, leaving in its wake a gout of cool air from the north, a result of the storm’s counterclockwise circulation.... [Read More]

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