A Long Read on Past and Future Civil Conflict

People have completely forgotten that in 1972 we had over nineteen hundred domestic bombings in the United States.” — Max Noel, FBI (ret.)

As I write this, the ’rats are in the process of stealing two senatorial elections: Florida and Arizona.  It’s the classic playbook: a close election, after which “uncounted ballots” are discovered in Democrat-heavy districts, their precise numbers undisclosed, with slaver lawyers parachuting in to make sure, as the rent-a-mobs chant, they “count every vote”.

Here is a long blog post, “Days of Rage”, dating from 2017-01-20 which I commend to your attention.  It starts out as a review of Brian Burrough’s 2015 eponymous book and then, like so many of my book reviews here, veers off into a long (in this case 13,000 word) riff on the book and what it means for us today.

For much of this young century, and especially since 2016, the U.S. has been in a Cold Civil War, and it is beginning to heat up.  People forget that in the early 1970s there were thousands of bombings by domestic revolutionaries who considered that their cause justified lethal force.

Today, the “correlation of forces” has changed.  The collectivists control the institutions and the means of communications, and they are more and more overt in exercising their power to silence the opposition.  And it is they who put the shock troops on the street.  Champions of liberty take comfort in the reality that we are armed and they are not, but they have demonstrated that they are willing to take the streets, destroy property, intimidate people, and cause injury.  We are much better behaved.

If you say, “It can’t happen here”, be aware that it did happen in the 1970s, and a converged media have suppressed the plain facts accessible by reading old newspapers or Burrough’s book (which I am reading and will review here in the fullness of time).

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